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Crosscut
Crosscut

401 Mercer St
Seattle, WA 98109   Directions

(206) 382-6137

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The political power of graffiti: Erased from CHOP, on display in Everett
07/10/2020 12:00am

Under different circumstances, these artists could have landed in the courthouse for spray painting the wall of a private building without permission. Instead theyre part of Schack Art Centers new exhibit American Graffiti: From the Streets to Canvas. The show features more than 80 recreations of street graffiti pieces many of which have been lost to time and repainting replicated on canvas by the original artists.Commissioned over a decade by a private collector who prefers, much like a graffiti artist, to remain anonymous, the works illustrate the ongoing conversations about the value of graffiti in the art world, the legitimacy of an art form rooted in an illegal act and the question of whether graffiti is even graffiti once it lands in a gallery.Read more: Where will all the art from Seattles CHOP go West Coast artistKing 157 is considered the king of freightcar graffiti. In this canvas recreation of a piece he originally painted on a train, he includedthe train caras well. Schack Art Center Theres tons of misunderstanding at almost every level of graffiti, says Susan A. Phillips, who has made a 30-year-long career out of studying graffiti. A professor and associate dean at Pitzer College in Claremont, California, Phillips authored the book The City Beneath: A Century of Los Angeles Graffiti, which came out last year.A lot of the misunderstanding comes from the hatred of graffiti because it violates laws and norms surrounding private property, Phillips says. That to me is one of the most powerful things about graffiti. When a writer tags a wall, they have gained power in the space if only temporarily.Watch: Muralists reflect on the public art that flourished from pandemic isolation and social protests.The Schack exhibit opened June 25, at a time when, 30 miles south in Seattle, protesters in the area known as CHOP Capitol Hill Organized Protest were coating the streets and surrounding buildings in graffiti and murals protesting police brutality and racial injustice. Anti-police and pro Black Lives Matter graffiti was painted on the Cal Anderson Fountain while the area was still considered part ofCHOP. The spray paint has since been painted over. Daniel Spils The CHOP graffiti was washed away about a week later, angering some participants. But the Schack show, which runs through Sept. 5,points to the value of preserving graffiti as shorthand for conveying messages, historic moments and movements.Between 2003 and 2012, the mysterious collector spent late nights meeting with graffiti artists in shadowy alleys and streets, asking for the whereabouts of people notorious for wanting to stay out of the limelight but it worked. His collection now spans more than 1,000 canvases most 6 by 10 feet, the bulk of which were originally created by artists in Harlem, the Bronx,Philadelphia, Los Angeles and San Francisco.Seattle has a worldwide reputation for its murals. Heres one of the reasons why. In Rattle Can Head,Chris Pape A.K.A. Freedom paints his self-portrait with the face of a spray can in place of his own. Chris Pape/Schack Art Center One corner of the Schack Art Center contains the collectors prize possessions: four Freedom Tunnel pieces by Chris Pape akaFreedom, including his self-portrait Rattle Can Head, in which he depicts himself as spray can, and tribute portraits of Woody Guthrie and Ted Williams. Between 1979 and 1994, Pape painted the original graffiti on the walls of the decommissioned Amtrak tunnel under Manhattan. When Amtrak recommissioned the tunnel, the company buffed out hundreds of murals and also displaced the homeless people who had found shelter inside.Also included in the exhibit is Papes homage to fine art, specifically Michelangelos The Creation of Adam, famously painted on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. In Papes rough black-and-white version, he zooms in on God and Adams relaxed hands, their fingers reaching for each other, and beneath it posits, What is art Why is Art Chris Papes recreation of What is Art Why is Art, one of his original murals from the Freedom Tunnel in New York City.Chris Pape/Schack Art Center For Judy Tuohy, Schack Art Centers executive director, that question speaks to why she thinks graffiti merits an exhibit. Its an art form that requires skill and attention, she says. The exhibit is also an opportunity to center the voices of artists whohavent traditionally been given platforms. Tuohy says a majority of the pieces in the exhibit were painted by people of color.Graffiti provided them a voice, she says. So what were doing here is making that voice even clearer for our community.One voice that stands out in the exhibit is STAY HIGH149, aka Wayne Roberts, who passed away in 2012. He started tagging buses in New York City in the 1960s when the city was dealing with rampant unemployment and financial instability. His pieces were the first to cover one whole subway car, from one end to the other, and his elegant signature with halos influenced young taggers for years. STAY HIGH, who was Black, changed his moniker to VOICE OF THE GHETTO after a High Times magazine article revealed his face and led to his arrest.While many of these early graffiti artists were tagging their namesrather than an overtly political message, their work invokes the saying that the medium is the message. It also highlights graffitis position as an easily accessible albeit illegal art form for the disenfranchised. As Phillips puts it, graffiti becomes a way that anybody can insert themselves into the public sphere. Wayne Roberts worked under the name STAY HIGH 149 and helped popularize the use of New York City buses and subways as a canvases withhis large murals in the 1960s. Before he died in 2012, he recreated this work for a Washington state collector. Wayne Roberts/Schack Gallery Even as graffiti makes its way into more galleries and art shows, some still write it off as vandalism. But graffiti raises interesting questions about power and permissions.Seattles Crick Lont, a former graffiti artist, says graffiti is like advertising, in that people dont usually have control over when they see it. Graffiti can be found in any city, as part of the landscape on fences, alleysand bridges. Itsends subliminal messages about who belongs where.Lont runs Dozers Warehouse on Beacon Hill, a former plumbing warehouseturned unofficial graffiti museum. The warehouse is suspended in real estate development purgatory its demolition date is constantly being pushed back, allowing for an ever-evolving show of graffiti. In this sense, Lont believes Dozers pays tribute to graffitis ephemeral nature. He is also of the school of thought that graffiti is only graffiti if its illegal. Once it hits an established gallery it is merely art in the graffiti style. But thats not necessarily a bad thing. In addition tohosting more than a dozen murals bygraffiti and mural artists, Dozers Warehouse in Beacon Hill is also known for its underground warehouse parties. Crick Lont If its done right, I think its awesome, especially for people in the graffiti scene ... Its made it so even graffiti artists can make money, says Lont, who started writing graffiti when he was 13. The cool thing about galleries leaning towards graffiti or street culture is that its more blunt ... and its putting that message into the gallery, in the faces of people who normally wouldnt see it. You can sneak your messages in.Lont points to some of the short, sharp political messages seen at CHOP as examples of graffitis bluntness. Scattered across the streets and buildings around Cal Anderson Park, tags included messages for the current moment, such as BLM Black Lives Matter, Defund SPD and Say our names alongside lists including George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Charleena Lyles. Also evident:perennial protest graffiti, such as ACAB All Cops Are Bastards, police the police and the classic Fuck the police. The area also included mural-style graffiti, such as the large yellow, blue and pink, 1970s-style piece dedicated to George Floyd on Cal Andersons water fountain. Floating above the massive mural of his name were words said by his daughter: Daddy Changed The World.Relatively few people attend protests as compared to the number of people who later see images of them circulated via social media, says Phillips, the Pitzer College professor. The images of graffiti from these protests are all over the place, and theyre just as poignant as a crowded shot full of masses of people. Theyre so good at crystallizing the impetus of the movement, she says.The political strife of the past month has given new life to graffiti as a tool and a voice specifically to assert that Black lives matter. The act of malicious mischief challenges the institutions that deem Black lives dispensable and graffiti art erasable. As the city of Seattle scrambled to decide how to preserve the art at CHOPlast week, it also erased graffiti coded with the demands of protesters. Graffiti covered surfaces all overthe CHOP area when it was still an active protest site. In this image, graffiti ranges from the concise BLM to the longer quote by slain Black Panther leader Fred Hampton: If you dare to struggle, you dare to win. Daniel Spils Phillips says political graffiti is rampant in countries undergoing social change, but its been largely dormant for decades in America. I think thats a signal of how theres been a kind of stasis around politics for many, many years, she says. The last time we had this much political writing in the U.S. was in the 1960s, and I thinkthis period really mirrors that in terms of the transformation along the lines of social justice and societal transformation, around issues of policing and police brutality and racial justice.Today, Schacks Tuohy, who is also Everetts sitting city council president,says she sees graffitis validation and the hard conversations about race as long overdue. Over the past two years spent organizing the exhibit, she says shes learned a lot about graffiti culture, its slang and varying styles. But her appreciation for it has also grown.Now, Tuohy watches when trains pass through downtown Everett, hoping to catch a glimpse of graffiti on the boxcars.Im looking at it as a little piece of art...or the wording, what theyre saying, she says. I would paint every blank wall around here if I could. Everett goes all in on graffiti American Graffiti: From the Streets to Canvas runs from June 25 to Sep. 5 free and in conjunction with a series of other community art events:JAG Artworks, an art supply store in Everett, is showing art by West Coast graffiti artists.A mural on California Avenue by Invisible Creature, the Seattle-based design firm behind the mural at Paul Allens Cinerama.In July, Camano Island-based artist Blake Taylor will paint a dragon-inspired mural at Schack Art Centers east entrance.A series of banners for the city designed and painted by local artists. Article continues below Related Stories This story has been updated to correct a spelling the Pitzer College professor quoted is Susan A. Phillips, not Susan. H. Phillips. Topics: Arts, Crime, Features, Pacific Northwest

Editor’s Notebook: Black cinematic brilliance online
07/09/2020 8:11am

As we reach the four-month mark of coronavirus closures, I find myself missing the popcorn crunchers my people, the weirdly timed laughers and the out-of-soda slurpers. I do not miss the midmovie texters, but other than those jerks, I really miss the whole experience of going to the movies the fake-butter-scented air, the scrambling for your seats, the lights going down as the communal anticipation amps up.Movie theaters arent allowed to open until Phase 3 and then at 50 capacity, and with COVID-19 cases on the rise, it seems like well be limited toa home-based movie experience for quite a bit longer.But if, like me, youre finding yourself flipping through the endless carousel of streaming shows and still cant find anything to watch, take heart that this week brings a wealth of enticing new options, thanks to local curators. Bonus: Watching and paying for these films via local theaters and presenters helps ensure well still have venues to visit when were allowed to get back into the seats safely. A still from the documentary John Lewis: Good Trouble, now streaming via several local outlets. Magnolia Pictures When it comes to exciting new releases, Hamilton is definitely not the only option.Local venues are screening a slew of new documentaries including films about a jazz great Ella Fitzgerald: Just One of Those Things, playing at SIFF Virtual Cinema, a civil rights giant John Lewis: Good Trouble, playing online at Northwest Film Forum, SIFFand Ark Lodge Cinema and a globally renowned artist and human rights activist Ai Wei Wei: Yours Truly, at Northwest Film Forum.If you need more escapism than realism right now, consider three new feature films offering fresh takes on the coming-of-age story. The Last Tree, popularly and too succinctly summarized as the British Moonlight, is a gorgeously filmed tale of adolescence and identity by British-Nigerian filmmaker Shola Amoo. Miss Juneteenth follows single mom and former beauty queen Turquoise Jones in her efforts to raise teenager Kai who has her own ideas about what success means. And in Skate Kitchen, a lonely young skateboarder finds camaraderie and challenges with an all-girl skateboarding crew in New York City. A still from the animated short film Black Champagne, the first in a series by Seattles Jeremiah Williams, screening at the Seattle Black Film Festival. SBFF This weekend also brings two entire film festivalsonline. The Seattle Black Film Festival formerly Langston Hughes African American Film Festival July 10-12, free, with donations encouraged has a rich slate of offerings that celebrate and elevate Black cinematic brilliance. One of the many things I like about the lineup is the emphasis on short films.Like the best short stories, short films can pack a punch sometimes more than a feature length movie. Plus these showcases allow you to experience a huge range of voices and styles, and find new filmmakers you want to follow. The Seattle Black Film Festival offerings include more than 30 films, made in Nigeria, Brazil, the U.K. and right here in Seattle. Watch for work by local filmmakers D.J. Walker Our Troll, about a curious visitor who comes to dinner Nifemi Madarikan Headless Into Night, a fantasy pitting mystics against a hyperconservative dad Kamari Bright RESPEK, an animated video poem Tifa Tomb and Nicole Pouchet Retch, a horror film about every commuters nightmare: a mysterious illness ravaging passengers on a broken down Metro bus and Jeremiah Williams Black Champagne, a beautifully animated, Afrofuturist music video about the priest and priestess of an ancient civilization.Also online: The Seattle Deaf Film Festival July 10-12, $13-$15 individual tickets, $70-$95 weekend pass, which has grown into one of the worlds largest events of its kind. The 2020 lineup features 27 films capturing the deaf and hard-of-hearing experience, including a slapstick movie from France, a Korean documentary about being hearing with deaf parents and another wide array of shorts all films captioned or subtitled in English. This years spotlight is on Black deaf artists, and features the movie Compensation screening for free, about the struggles of a Black couple one hearing, one deaf as portrayed in a 1906 poem by Paul Laurence Dunbar. Black deaf actress Michelle Angela Banks has the starring role.Sounds like a lot of great reasons to sit on the couch. Just remember, one benefit ofwatching movies from home besides the absence of parking hassles and people stepping on your toes when they edge in 15 minutes late is that you can choose to mix up your viewing location. Start in the kitchen and move to the bedroom. Or drag your computer to a balcony, porch or park and pop in the headphones. When it does return, the movie theater experience willlikelyfeel pretty different might as well get used to mixing up the routine. And dont forget to BYO popcorn. Pro tip: Old Bay seasoning takes the kernels up to red carpet level. Article continues below Related Stories Topics: Arts, Coronavirus, Features, Film

The pandemic’s surging toll on mental health
07/09/2020 12:00am

People working on the front lines as behavioral health clinicians are diligently providing care for those who need it now, while also preparing for the pandemics potential long-term impacts.Unfortunately, even in the best of times, mental health needs have been historically underserved in our state and local communities. According to the Washington State Department of Health, approximately 650,000 Washingtonians were receiving treatment for behavioral health needs before the COVID-19 outbreak. However, approximately 700,000 more had mental health concerns but were not receiving services.This describes our states behavioral health care deficit before the coronavirus. The pandemic has challenged and upended the physical health, work, social connections, personal routines and simple comforts that many of us rely on for sustaining our well-being.People who struggled with mental health and substance abuse disorders before may find their symptoms exacerbated by the disruption in care, social isolation and economic difficulties. Those who may not have struggled with mental health concerns prior to COVID-19 may discover a new onset of symptoms that surface during this time of unprecedented stress.The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration offers a Phases of Disaster framework that shows how people tend to respond physically and emotionally under stress from natural and human-caused disasters.After the initial impact of the disaster, there is a heroic phase, followed by a honeymoon phase, then a steep drop into disillusionment, until finally a prolonged reconstruction phase.In my estimate, as a community we are likely embarking upon the disillusionment phase, which can last up to one year. This excerpt from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administrations description of the disillusionment phase may resonate: As optimism turns to discouragement and stress continues to take a toll, negative reactions, such as physical exhaustion or substance use, may begin to surface. The increasing gap between need and assistance leads to feelings of abandonment. Especially as the larger community returns to business as usual, there may be an increased demand for services, as individuals and communities become ready to accept support.The state Department of Health has examined Washingtons population data in the context of known cycles of psychological disaster response and shared its dire expectation: Between 2 million and 3 million Washington residents could experience behavioral health symptoms consistent with acute stress, anxiety or increasing depression over the next three to six months. A second pandemic wave would dramatically change this forecast.Our already-stretched behavioral health resources will be severely challenged as our community recovers from the pandemic. In addition, the death of George Floyd, social unrest and persistent systemic racial injustice continue to perpetuate trauma. It is critical that services are available and further expanded as our country confronts these dual public health crises.This is a difficult time for everyone, and many people experience the disaster response cycle with discomfort, but it is important to know this is a normal response.Resilience can be practiced and learned and, in the next several months, we can look to our social connections, support groups, organizations and other resources for reinforcement. Its essential for each of us to work toward enhancing our coping skills, which include: connecting with our community in creative ways videoconferencing meetings or virtual game nights, for example eating well and drinking plenty of water getting enough sleep and physical exercise practicing meditation or deep breathing and avoiding mind-altering substances, which can exasperate symptoms. In addition, focusing on healthy thinking strategies is crucial.It is important to acknowledge the uncertainty we are facing while also combating the feelings of uncertainty by recognizing what is still in our control. Implementing a practice of gratitude has also been scientifically proven to boost resilience. An easy way to start is to end each day by naming three things you are grateful for. The state coronavirus response website offers resources for enhancing your own and your familys mental and emotional well-being.To everyone who is struggling now, I encourage you to seek help sooner rather than later. More now than ever, it is critical that we eliminate the stigma and barriers to mental health care. If you are experiencing anxiety, depression or other mental health and substance use concerns because of COVID-19 implications in your life or otherwise, know that you are not alone and your symptoms are treatable. Dont delay care because of fear of catching COVID-19 at the hospital we have protocols in place to protect you, or we can provide virtual visits at your convenience. Your mental health cant wait. Topics: Coronavirus, Health, Healthcare

Apocalypse: Now What? Fauci’s tools to fight the pandemic
07/09/2020 12:00am

Coronavirus has changed our reality for the foreseeable future, prompting questions from you about how to navigate our strange new normal. In this weekly column, we hope to answer them with practical advice, ideas and solutions. Ask your question at the bottom of this story.Question:Dr. Anthony Fauci said we could see 100,000 cases per day if we continue on the path were on. If the United States is truly past the realm of contact tracing or any of the normal containment methods actually helping, what are we left with What does that mean for overcoming this virus Ah, the Abyss. Not this one. Or this one. Staring into it in search of ways to stanch a pandemic beats shouting into it, especially because shouting turns you into a superspreader. But you are right to heed Daddy Fauci and tremble.With coronavirus cases surging nationally and here in Washington, we are likely a long way from seeing the bottom of the pit. A grossly inadequate national response now threatens the relative early success of regional moves like our own Stay Home, Stay Healthy order. The pandemic might have spidered beyond the realm where contact tracing can help us, and even though were testing more than ever, the U.S. is now testing only at the level we needed in March. Dont look at the calendar, or youll faint, asI did. Pool testing could help us speed up the process, but probably not enough.But in any emergency, the first goal is not to panic. So sit down. Take a deep breath. Hydrate. Lets leave our worries about Aunt Tammy in Texas or Uncle Frank in Florida for a few minutes and look at some regional bright sides. Though cases are on the rise in Washington, they are nowhere near the March/April peak. Hospital capacity here remains robust, and more than half of the new infections are occurring in generally healthy people between 20 and 39. As such, hospitalization rates are actually lower now than the first part of June, even though positive diagnoses rose.Related:A psychotherapist tries to answer a question all our bodies are asking: COVID or NOVIDOK, thats all the good news Ive got, so chug that water or brown liquor, be real and put your mask back on. An increase in deathsalmost always lags behind case increases, and as long as cases go up the chances for the virus to spread and kill more people go up, too. It can and will come back to bite us hard. Coronavirus More like Corleonevirus.So what tools remain Herd immunity the idea that a high enough proportion of the population has developed immunities to render contagion unlikely would be far too costly. Even by conservative measures, some experts think 5 million people would have to die for us to reach the 70 to 75 infected population threshold for this to work. Also, some worrying studies coming from China indicate that immunities might disappear after a few months. Gonna call the herd option a big nope.A workable vaccine by the end of 2020 is our next shot from half court. While Daddy Fauci and others have expressed some optimism at the prospect, serious hurdles remain: The current international, multibillion-dollar effort is still akin to landing on the moon perfectly on the first try which, by the way, didnt happen. Whats more, some vaccine trial recipients have experienced extreme side effects, like fainting or high fevers and thats in healthy human guinea pigs, not immunocompromised folks who would need the vaccine most.Additionally, its not clear the antibodies produced would stop future infections. As of now, its possible antiviral drugs and lab-produced antibodies show more promise: Timelinesfor testing drug cocktails like these are faster, and they could treat vulnerable people in the early stages of the disease, prevent infection and help people clear infections faster. But the disease would still circulate in the human population until we get a vaccine.But now Ill ask you to stare into the abyss yet again, and really squint hard. Can you see it, glowing dimly at the bottom Ah, yes there it is: a mask.Until those ivory-tower eggheads up their jumper, its up to each and every one of us to stay vigilant, no matter how dead tired we are of this pandemic. Masks, physical distancing, washing hands and being extremely cautious about some of the things that make being human bearable hugs, drinking brown liquor in cramped public places with friends, observing various sportballs with strangers will save lives and buy Science the time it needs to save us.Right now, each of us has the power to control our own behavior it might be the only thing we have control over. And for now, even Daddy Fauci agrees its the most powerful tool we have. Topics: Apocalypse Now What, Coronavirus, Health, Northwest Wonders, Science

Art Seen: Seattle artists make plywood their canvas
07/08/2020 11:59pm

Press pause and explorethe hidden art of the everyday.View the beauty behindthe objects and practices that weavein to our daily lives. Discover the visual and auralmoments that make this region and its people unique. From rock walls that conceal a world ofchoreographyto finding personality in code, well take viewers there through sensory-centric experiences.See more stories here. Transcript00:00Gentle mysterious music00:06Nikki Frumkin:I thinka lot of peopleare feeling waves of emotions.00:16Jillian Chong: A lot of artistsare popping up everywhere,trying to add some lifeinto this situation.00:30Joe Nix: Were out herepouring our hearts out.00:35Takiyah Ward: Weve been coopedup in our houses for monthsfor fear of virus,and then the virus thatis racism in Americarears its ugly head.00:47Joseph Francis: Right now,Americas crying,Americas bleeding, you know And then the whole worldhears it and feels it.01:00LogoGentle mysterious music01:07Morgan Zion: Somebodyreached out to me,and she was like,I need you to comeand mural up my board.I dont like thisdepressing feelingof having just a board up.01:15Morgan Zion:And then I was like, Girl,I am there for you.01:26Keoke Silvano: With the coronavirus,been a lot of xenophobicsentiments comingtowards Asians.People have been poking theirheads into Jade Restaurantand saying, Hey, stopserving that batsoup.01:35Keoke Silvano:I wanted to make surethat we prevent peoplefrom tagging the business.01:43Carol Rashawnna Williams:Were allsuffering the same anxiety.And so, for me, art is away that can help peoplejust feel a little bit happy.01:52Carol Rashawnna Williams:I mean, even 5 happinessjust walking by,and if you smile and you see it,to me, that is apositive. Laughs02:03Jillian Chong: If youre an artist,youre an entrepreneur,so you dont always knowwhen the moneys coming in.02:09Joe Nix: Im terrified every dayabout whats gonnahappen with my business.Ihad to close because ofeverything thats happening.02:17Carol Rashawnna Williams:I workfull-time as an artist and as soon as COVID hit,all of my contracts, all of myexhibitions,basically either gotcanceled or put on hold.And it was devastating.02:35Nikki Frumkin: Its definitely tough,but its been niceto sort of seehow creativity isshowingup in unexpected places.02:50Carol Rashawnna Williams: Today thiswoman walked by,and she said, I dont seeany other Black artistsdown here painting murals.02:57Carol Rashawnna Williams:And theres a problem with that,and its becauseof the same reasonmy community is gettingdevastated by COVID.03:05Takiyah Ward:Weve been coopedup in our houses for monthsfor fear of virus,and then the virus thatis racism in Americarears its ugly head.03:15Crowd chanting:Whose lives matterBlack lives matter03:29Che Sehyun:I was hereout in the streets,and the police werestaying a block away,literally babysittingwhite vandalers,and they didntprotect the ID at all.03:38Che Sehyun:Different people, not justAsian people, coming together,there are Black people,theres white people,theres Indigenous peopleall coming together right now.03:47Spray paintcan clacking03:55Joseph Francis:Being Black in America,when I walk up,I have to prove who I am.04:01Joseph Francis:When the world saw whathappened to George Floyd,that right there wasa blatant lynchingin front of everybody.04:10Kelli Wimbley:Seattle is waking up.I think its waking up.I think theresbeen a lotta hurtin this community,people being displaced,04:20Kelli Wimbley: The governmentsthat are in chargehave been erasing Blackpeople in communitiesfor a long time.And this is a response.04:37Gentle meditative music04:40Joseph Francis:The starsright there are fading, cause thats how I feelabout America right now.The stripes are bleeding.04:47Joseph Francis:The arts are from the heavens.Thats a miracle that onlysometimes I get to experience,04:56Joseph Francis: But when Im down therepainting it with the people,we all experience it.00:04:59Takiyah Ward:The pandemic obviouslybrought on challengesthat no one couldve imagined,and artists showed up.05:06Takiyah Ward:And then the virus thatis racism in Americarears its ugly head.So once again,artists, we show up. Topics: Art Seen, Arts, Multimedia, Race, Video

El Siete Dias
El Siete Dias

12005 NE 12th St
Bellevue, WA 98005   Directions

(425) 646-8846

Website

Abril periodico 2020
01/18/2016 4:06am

Directorio 2020
01/18/2016 4:06am

Clasificados
01/18/2016 3:59am

KCTS-TV
KCTS-TV

401 Mercer St
Seattle, WA 98109   Directions

(206) 728-6463

Website

KIRO-TV
KIRO-TV

2807 3rd Ave
Seattle, WA 98121   Directions

(206) 728-7777

Website

KOMO-TV
KOMO-TV

140 4th Ave N
Seattle, WA 98109   Directions

(206) 404-4079

Website

KSTW-TV / CW 11
KSTW-TV / CW 11

1000 Dexter Ave N
Seattle, WA 98109   Directions

(206) 441-1111

Website

Fridge Wars – Show Description
07/10/2020 12:40pm

Top chefs compete to make an amazing feast using leftovers and ingredients found in your fridge in the culinary competitionFRIDGE WARS. Each episode, two top chefs are pitted against one another with a challenge to create extraordinary meals using only the ingredients taken from the fridges of ordinary families. We learn why dinnertime is a

Being Ruben – Show Description
07/10/2020 12:24pm

InBEING REUBEN, fourteen year-old Reuben de Maid, a talented teen juggling social media stardom with real-life squabbling siblings, became an internet sensation after shooting to fame following an appearance on Little Big Shots. The Welsh teenager is a singer, influencer and make-up expert, and now has a high-profile career. In this fun, inspiring and warm-hearted

Killer Camp – “A Killer in the Camp”
07/10/2020 11:46am

SERIES PREMIERE In this British reality competition series, eleven strangers arrive at Camp Pleasant eager to enjoy some peace and quiet when they are stunned by the news from Camp Counselor Bobby Bobby Mair that they haveactually arrivedat KILLER CAMP. Each night, one camper will be killed by a bloody, bandaged handyman who is given

In the Dark Cast Chat With Calle Walton!
07/10/2020 11:35am

Executive Producer Corinne Kingsbury and actor Calle Walton discuss her character including her favorite scenes as well as what it feels like to be one of the first blind actors as a television regular Stream episodes of In The Dark Fridays free only on The CW.

Ruby Rose Congratulates Batwoman Replacement Javicia Leslie
07/10/2020 7:55am

Ruby Rose congratulates amazing Batwoman replacement Javicia Leslie.

KUNS-TV
KUNS-TV

140 4th Ave N
Seattle, WA 98109   Directions

(206) 404-6684

Website

Puget Sound Business Journal
Puget Sound Business Journal

801 2nd Ave
Seattle, WA 98104   Directions

(206) 876-5500

Website

Opinion: Higher-ed issues have been catalyzed by the pandemic
07/11/2020 4:00pm

A crisis has a funny way of exposing deep structural issues that may have liked to stay hidden for a little while longer. This is exactly what has happened to the U.S. higher education system after the coronavirus hit in mid-March. Students were sent home for the spring semester and classes moved online.And now parents and student loan borrowers alike are beginning to question if the money they pay each year to be on campus is worth it. For those who study college affordability, questioning

Patti Payne's Cool Pads: Vegas Billionaire's 285-foot megayacht slips into Elliott Bay
07/11/2020 2:43pm

Over the years, PattiPaynes Cool Pads has included everything from treehouses to houseboats, and mansions to cottages. Now we include the Lonian, a 285-foot-long megayacht, sittingat anchor out in Elliott Bay, having slipped into Seattle waters after traveling here from San Diego on Friday, July 10. It certainly qualifies as a very Cool Pad This $150 million head-turner is not for sale and is owned by Las Vegas billionaire entrepreneur, investor and philanthropistLorenzo Fertitta who

Rainier Industries found growth in an unexpected place after Covid-19 slowed Aerospace sector
07/11/2020 12:00pm

A new line of products helping businesses respond to the Covid-19 has offered unexpected growth for the Tukwila manufacturer.

Alaska Airlines joining One World carrier alliance months earlier than expected
07/10/2020 5:12pm

The Alaska CEO said hes very, very excited about what this means for building passenger loyalty.

An international retailer's demand for sneeze guards has a Seattle contractor very busy
07/10/2020 5:10pm

The rush job came in on a recent Friday and it has quickly grown into an international assignment for Seattles Howard S. Wright, a Balfour Beatty company.

Seattle Business Monthly
Seattle Business Monthly

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Seattle, WA 98134   Directions

(206) 284-1750

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Seattle Post-Intelligencer
Seattle Post-Intelligencer

2901 3rd Ave
Seattle, WA 98121   Directions

(206) 448-8030

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The Falcon
The Falcon

3210 4th Ave W
Seattle, WA 98119   Directions

(206) 281-2913

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The Seattle Medium
The Seattle Medium

2600 S Jackson St
Seattle, WA 98144   Directions

(206) 323-3070

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Podcast: In Her Own Words – Tia Shabazz’s 94-Day Battle With COVID-19
07/10/2020 7:11pm

Rhythm & News interview with Tia Shabazz, a COVID-19 survivor, about her 94-day battle with the virus. Interview by Chris B. BennettThe post Podcast: In Her Own Words Tia Shabazzs 94-Day Battle With COVID-19 appeared first on The Seattle Medium.

Donté Stallworth On NFL’s Black Anthem Issue: They Have To Do A Lot More
07/10/2020 10:50am

Former NFL player Dont Stallworth weighs in on the NFLs plan to play the song Lift Every Voice and Sing --known as the Black national anthem-- before every game in Week 1 of the NFL season.The post Dont Stallworth On NFLs Black Anthem Issue: They Have To Do A Lot More appeared first on The Seattle Medium.

Black Nurses Face Two Pandemics
07/10/2020 10:46am

The anti-racism movements sweeping the world come at a time when countries are struggling to contain the coronavirus outbreak. Britains black nurses have found themselves on the front line of both these battles, tasked with helping to save the country from a deadly virus while struggling to be treated as equals in health care. CNNs Salma Abdelaziz spent weeks speaking to a dozen black nurses who shared their experiences with racism during a pandemic.The post Black Nurses Face Two Pandemics appeared first on The Seattle Medium.

Audio Reveals Conflicting Accounts Surrounding Breonna Taylor’s Death
07/10/2020 10:41am

Newly released audio from the internal investigation into Breonna Taylors death illustrates conflicting accounts of whether police identified themselves before ultimately breaking down Taylors door in an incident which led to her death.The post Audio Reveals Conflicting Accounts Surrounding Breonna Taylors Death appeared first on The Seattle Medium.

States Struggle With Reopening Of Schools
07/10/2020 10:34am

We all want to protect the safety of the children that are in schools, Redfield said. Theres really a public health crisis. We are paying by not having these schools open, and I think we really need to get that balance.The post States Struggle With Reopening Of Schools appeared first on The Seattle Medium.

The Seattle Times
The Seattle Times

1000 Denny Way
Seattle, WA 98109   Directions

(206) 464-2111

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Ghosn says he is aiding those who helped him flee to Lebanon
07/12/2020 6:11am

BEIRUT AP Former Nissan Motor Co. Chairman Carlos Ghosn says he is assisting those who helped him flee from Japan to Lebanon last year but refuses to provide details about the escape, saying such information would endanger them. In an interview aired late Saturday by the pan-Arab Al-Arabiya TV, Ghosn refused to comment on

Churches amid the pandemic: Some outbreaks, many challenges
07/12/2020 6:04am

NEW YORK AP Crowded bars and house parties have been identified as culprits in spreading the coronavirus. Meat packing plants, prisons and nursing homes are known hot spots. Then theres the complicated case of Americas churches. The vast majority of these churches have cooperated with health authorities and successfully protected their congregations. Yet from

Pope ‘deeply pained’ over Turkey’s move on Hagia Sophia
07/12/2020 6:03am

VATICAN CITY AP Pope Francis said on Sunday that he is deeply pained over the decision by Turkey to change the status of Hagia Sophia which was originally built in Istanbul as a Christian cathedral from a museum to a mosque. In a very brief, improvised remark, Francis, speaking from his studio

Iran blames bad communication, alignment for jet shootdown
07/12/2020 5:58am

TEHRAN, Iran AP Iranian investigators are blaming a misaligned missile battery and miscommunication between soldiers and their commanders for the Revolutionary Guard shooting down a Ukrainian jetliner in January, killing 176 people. The report released late Saturday by Irans Civil Aviation Organization comes months after the Jan. 8 crash near Tehran, which authorities for

Games maker Ubisoft shakes up staff amid misconduct probe
07/12/2020 5:19am

PARIS AP French gaming giant Ubisoft is parting ways with its creative director and two other executives and promising zero tolerance for toxic staff behavior following an internal investigation of misconduct and media reports of sexual harassment. In a statement Sunday, Ubisoft CEO Yves Guillemot said the developer of Assassins Creed and other games

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