Local News
in Seattle, WA

Showing 1 - 13 out of 13

Right here in your city, we have a broad selection of local news organizations and stations reporting on the daily happenings throughout the area, from charity events to crime, and so much more. Everyone has their favorite local news provider, but now you can explore all the local news offerings throughout the region in one convenient location.

Our directory has compiled a full list of local news stations and organizations. We have included the address, phone number, website, and driving directions of each station in the region. When you need to report on a story, learn about upcoming events, or simply want to catch up on the latest news in your community, we make finding the information easier than ever before.

To use our directory, click on the local news category and then find the station that interests you most. If you click the business name, you’ll be redirected to their profile, where you can find contact and location information in greater detail.

If you operate a local news station or organization, reach out today. We would be happy to add your information or update existing information in the directory. We actively help consumers find your local news more easily!
Crosscut
Crosscut

401 Mercer St
Seattle, WA 98109   Directions

(206) 382-6137

Website

Seattle issues 30-day ban on tear gas at protests
06/05/2020 9:46am

Seattle Police Chief Carmen Best has ordered, and I agree, she will immediately issue a directive to her officers banning the use of tear gas for 30 days at any of these protests, Durkan said, adding SPD officers do not need to be using tear gas at protests as a crowd management tool.During the 30-day ban, sworn and civilian accountability bodies will conduct a review of the departments crowd and event management policies, Durkan said.SPD remains committed to the mission of managing demonstrations and managing events where no crowd control tools must be used,Best said. But we also must protect the life and the property of this great city.The mayors decision comes on the recommendation of public health officials and just hours after the citys three pillars of police oversight the Community Police Commission, the Office of Inspector General and the Office of Police Accountability jointly recommended that the department stop using tear gas until such time as any appropriate use can be vetted by oversight entities and incorporated into a written SPD policy.Tear gas is a serious and indiscriminate use of force, theRev. Aaron Williams, the Rev. Harriet Walden and Prachi Dave, co-chairs of the Community Police Commission, said in a statement. Indeed, the Chemical Weapons Convention has explicitly banned the use of tear gas. Furthermore, infectious disease experts have warned police departments around the country against using tear gas, which causes people to cough and can make the body more susceptible to infection, only helping to spread the coronavirus during this pandemic.Rubber bullets and pepper spray have not been banned. The use of blast balls, which explode with a loud noise, will also continue, despite past recommendations from watchdog groups to ban them.After weeks of quiet amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Seattle streets exploded with activity over the past weekin the wake of George Floyds killing by a Minneapolis police officer. His death and that of Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and many others cracked open long-simmering anger over how Black people and people of color are treated by law enforcement and other systems of the United States.Rarely has the country seen such widespread public activism as in the past week. And as the demonstrations have grown, so too havescrutiny and criticism of law enforcements response, including its use of tear gas. The images of the heavy haze have spanned the country from clearing protesters away from President Donald Trump in Washington, D.C.,to creeping through the streets of Capitol Hill in Seattle.Although marked bycontroversy and arguments over the right way to protest, the demonstrations in Seattle have clearly had an impact. In addition to the tear gas ban, Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes said he would no longer seek to remove federal oversight of the police department, the King County Labor Council threatened to kick out the Seattle Police Officers Guild and several elected officials have called for drastic reductions in the police departments budget.The protests in Seattle, involving groups of people consistently numbering in the thousands, have been largely peaceful, including late night dance parties and impromptu concerts. The past several nights have seen limited conflict, but the gatherings have also seen occasional property destruction and flare-ups between demonstrators and police.The tactics used by the Seattle Police Department including its use of blast balls, pepper spray and tear gas have come under intense scrutinyfrom both activists and elected officials.I have never in 25 years of participating in protests in the city of Seattle experienced such an indiscriminate use of tear gas, pepper spray and flash bombs against people who werent doing anything wrong, with so little effort to de-escalate, to negotiate with protesters, to utilize peacekeepers and to focus your efforts on people who are doing wrong, Seattle City Councilmember Lisa Herbold said Wednesday.Councilmember Andrew Lewis said on Twitter Friday, If there was ever an easy thing to ban from American streets, its tear gas.During a recent meeting of the Seattle City Council, citizens repeatedly demanded the department stop using tear gas. One man described the vapors wafting into his apartment window and causing his young child to cough and cry. His family retreated to their car to escape.Durkan has been met with similar cries when she appearedbefore protesters earlier in the week, crowd members shouted, No more gas.Beyond advocates and some elected officials, public health officials have come out against the use of tear gas, especially as COVID-19 remains a threat.Public Health Seattle & King County opposes the use of tear gas andother respiratory irritants based on the potential to increase COVID-19 spread, Dr. Jeff Duchin, the agencys health officer, tweeted.Durkan said the police department will look to creative approaches to crowd management as the protests continue, including working with protesters to de-escalate tense situations on their own and deploying a microphone system to foster better communication. Topics: Crime, Law & Justice

A short, violent history of Puget Sound uprisings, protests and riots
06/05/2020 12:00am

What follows is a nonexhaustive review of some of our regions experience with violent protests or clashes. Some have arguably yielded positive results, while others reflect tragedy, human cruelty and senseless destruction. Many of societys faults and fault lines featured here remain intact. The violence gets attention, and today it is being exposed, broadcast and tweeted as never before. The smartphone is now an essential part of protest documentation. The historical record is another window that can provide context and background for what we are seeing today.The followingis offered in that spirit.Race riotsViolent removals of Chinese residents in Tacoma and SeattleIn 1885, the mayor of Tacoma, Jacob Weisbach, led a regional effort to exclude all Chinese immigrants from Western Washington, an effort largely planned during a regional anti-Chinese meeting in Seattle. Tacoma ordered the Chinese population out of town and rounded up hundreds who did not obey. A mob armed with clubs and guns abused them, force-marched them to a train, then razed and burned their homes and businesses. The effort, led by the citys civic leaders, was so cruel and efficient that such tactics became known as the Tacoma method.In 1886, Seattle tried to do the same. Inspired by the murder of Chinese hop pickers in Issaquah and stirred by the Knights of Labor, who wanted the Chinese expelled for supposedly taking jobs from whites, a large mob brutally herded the majority of the citys Chinese residents to a wharf, where they were to be placed on a steamship bound for San Francisco. One hundred or so Chinese residents were not able to get onboard and, under protection of a phalanx of Seattle Home Guards, were escorted back toward Chinatown, but they were confronted on the way by an angry white mob. They fought with fists and clubs until finally the guards fired their rifles into the crowd, killing one rioter and injuring several more. Martial law was declared, U.S Army troops were called in to patrol the city. The soldiers remained for months to ensure calm, but only a small Chinese population remained in Seattle following the violent expulsion.Anti-Chinese sentiment had been festering on the West Coast for years. They were targets of the Ku Klux Klan in California and Oregon going back to the late 1860s, but it was the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act that fueled the forced removal. Signed by President Chester A. Arthur, the racist law outlawed immigration of Chinese laborers. Thousands of records of Chinese immigrants from that era are stored in the federal archives at Sand Point in Seattle. The Trump administration has slated the archives facility to be closed and its contents removed, but much of that history is being recovered by volunteer researchers.Soldiers vs. prisoners of war at Fort LawtonIn 1944, Black soldiers stationed at Fort Lawton, now part of Discovery Park, were upset that Italian prisoners of war held there received more privileges than Black soldiers because the prisoners were white, even though they were enemies at war with the United States. A riot broke out perhaps one stoked by white military police officers and dozens were hurt, including an Italian POW who was lynched. Over 40 Black soldiers were charged with riot or manslaughter and court martialed, despite a lack of evidence. That railroading resulted in 28 soldiers being convicted and sentenced to hard labor, and ultimately dishonorably discharged. Research into the case by Seattle author Jack Hamann helped uncover and correct the injustice of unfair charges, secret trials and a military cover-up. It remains unknown who lynched the Italian prisoner, but white soldiers were also suspected, though not charged. The convicted soldiers were formally acquitted in 2008, and the Army issued an apology in a formal ceremony. Unfortunately, only two of the men were still living by the time they were acquitted.The aftermath of Martin Luther King Jr.s assassinationIn the spring of 1968, Dr. Marin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated. Mourning was widespread nationally, and in Seattle vigils were held across the city. A wave of social unrest ensued, including violent protests. One positive outcome here was that the city of Seattle finally overcame local resistance to open housing, allowing people of any race to buy or rent property in the city. The policy had been put to a vote in 1964 and, disturbingly, lost by a 2-to-1 margin. But motivated by the potential for greater unrest and under mounting pressure from civil rights activists in the Black community, the city council finally passed it into law three weeks after Kings death. Shortly before Kings murder, there was a peaceful sit-in at Franklin High School in South Seattle protesting the treatment of Black students. It was the first of its kind in a city high school. The day King died, that April, some of the Franklin sit-in activists were arrested for unlawful assembly and accused of inciting riot. The student demonstrators, who included Larry Gossett, Aaron Dixon and Carl Miller, were imprisoned and forced to stand trial. In July, they were convicted and sentenced to six months in jail for a gross misdemeanor a sentence that was clearly a gross injustice. Outrage triggered two days of rock throwing, lootings and overturned cars in the Central District. Police responded with tear gas. Central District leaders, including the Black Panthers, attempted to restore order. Later that month, violence erupted again when Seattle police raided the Black Panther offices. The anger of that summer stemmed from the chronic, systemic mistreatment of Black people by the police and justice system. Protests over injustice and the treatment of the Black community continued. Franklin High School sit-in defendants at King County jail, April 1968. From left to right: Aaron Dixon, Larry Gossett, Carl Miller, and an unidentified Black Panther Party. MOHAI Rodney King riots of 1992In May 1992, a jury acquitted four Los Angeles police officers of beating unarmed Rodney King. The vicious incident was caught on video by a private citizen who lived nearby. It was later broadcast on local TV and went viral. The verdict caused major rioting in LA, but also disturbances in Seattle, where protesters and anarchists set fires, threw rocks and trashed parts of downtown and Capitol Hill. This would not be the last time an injustice against African Americans would motivate such an event.Labor riotsPotlatch mayhem of 1913In 1913, Seattle marked its annual civic festival, the Golden Potlatch, in which white businessmen appropriated Northwest First Nations attire to celebrate the city, its industry and its imperial domain extending to Alaska. A woman named Annie Miller took to Occidental Avenue, in Pioneer Square, to advocate for womens suffrage. Accounts vary, but she may or may not have talked about socialism, or disparaged the military. She was not an Industrial Workers of the World union rabble-rouser, as the press claimed. A drunken sailor apparently objected to her speech and grabbed or assaulted her. A spectator defended Miller, a fistfight followed and more sailors and soldiers joined in, resulting in an all-out brawl over political speech. The local papers fanned the flames, especially The Seattle Daily Times, whose publisher, Alden Blethen, claimed a left-wing revolution was at hand, and the coverage fomented further violence. The following night, rioters by the hundreds, perhaps thousands, many of them military personnel, continued to terrorize the streets, destroying the headquarters of the IWW and ransacking the offices of local socialists. The progressive mayor, George Cotterill, outraged by the Timess inflammatory coverage, sent the police to stop the newspapers publication. A writer for a Seattle socialist paper described Blethen as an aged lunatic tottering toward a mad house of bedlam and energetic fur, lashing himself with his wild imaginings and stinging himself to death with the noisome venom of his own hate. Nevertheless, a judge overruled Cotterill and the presses rolled. Martial law was declared and the rioting quelled. A crowd of men and a few boys look over the ruined interior of the Socialist Party headquarters, on the first floor of a building at 1909 Fifth Avenue, July 18, 1913. Asahel Curtis/Washington State Historical Society The Everett Massacre of 1916A strike against Everetts shingle mills raised tensions in the City of Smokestacks in 1916. The strike was settled, but one mill held out and members of the radical Industrial Workers of the World lent their support to the workers. The city had outlawed public speaking about socialism, so the Wobblies wanted to make a protest point. Two steamers full of activists headed to Everett, but the Snohomish County sheriff and an armed deputized posse met the first. Someone fired a shot, then the workers standing on the deck of the boat exchanged gunfire with those on the dock. The gunfight left two deputies dead and 20 sheriffs men wounded. At least five Wobblies were killed, perhaps as many as a dozen, and 27 were wounded. Seventy-four Wobblies were arrested when they arrived back in Seattle, but only one was charged with murder he was later acquitted. The governor summoned the National Guard to both cities to quiet things down. The composer Wayne Horvitz later wrote an opera about the massacre, which he called, Smokestack Arias.The 1919 Centralia TragedyA violent clash between American Legionnaires and Wobblies occurred in Centralia in 1919 on the first anniversary of the World War I armistice. The Industrial Workers of the World was active in the mills and lumber camps in the area. The unions headquarters in town had been shut down by locals, but they reopened. A parade of Legionnaires stopped in front of its offices in an old hotel, at which point some in the parade broke ranks and charged the Wobblies hangout. Shooting started. The armed IWW members claimed self-defense, while the marchers claimed they were ambushed. Four Legionnaires were killed, a Wobbly was lynched, and the rest were rounded up and tried for murder. Many were convicted on slim evidence in an unfair trial and given lengthy sentences. The lynch mob was never brought to justice.An anarchist bomb goes offBy the spring of 1919, Seattle Mayor Ole Hanson had steered the city through the Spanish flu pandemic and the Seattle General Strike, which was a peaceful shutdown of the entire city. There was no rioting or violence, but Hanson exaggerated the threat of Bolshevism. He became a national hero for standing up to the so-called Red menace, as people feared that general strikes would proliferate around the country and Russian-style revolution would follow. It did not. But that publicity seems to have had a downside for Hanson. In April, his office received a package. Hanson was out of town and his secretary opened it upside down inside was a bomb that did not explode. Its arrival had been timed for May Day. An anarchist group had sent bombs to dozens of prominent Americans politicians, businessmen and law enforcement officials. Some months later, Hanson resigned from office to travel the country to enjoy a heady and lucrative 15 minutes of fame as a hero of anti-communism. He later moved to California.Communist bashing on Skid RoadThe Great Depression saw lots of social unrest, demonstrations and crackdowns on radicals and the unemployed. Many jobless workers turned to radical groups for solutions. A painting of an incident, dated May 1, 1930, epitomizes the era. It shows police attacking a crowd of communist demonstrators at the corner of Occidental Avenue and Washington Street, in the heart of Skid Road. Police on horseback seem to be brutally breaking up a gathering using nightsticks and trampling demonstrators. The painter was a man named Ronald Debs Ray Ginther, who grew up in a radical family his middle name was for Socialist Eugene Debs and who documented life during the Depression, including police harassment and Hooverville, according to University of Washington history professor James Gregory. His paintings were based on what he witnessed, though some were not painted until decades later. I couldnt find press accounts of a May 1 event that year, but a short article in The Seattle Times a couple of months earlier, in March 1930, has all the features portrayed here. A parade of 200 communists marched at noon, attracting some 5,000 spectators. The parade had hardly gone 50 feet before squads of mounted patrolmen, motorcycle men and officers swinging nightsticks broke it up, the paper reported. Twelve men were arrested in the bloody brouhaha. Cracking down on Reds, labor groups, the homeless and the jobless was almost routine for the police and authorities during the Depression in Seattle. Artist Ronald D. Ginthers 1930 watercolor and ink painting captures a bloody riot on Skid Road at the corner of Occidental and Washington streets in Seattle. Ronald D. Ginther/Washington State Historical Society The waterfront riots of 1934A massive, 83-day strike of West Coast longshoremen was called in the summer of 1934 and accompanied by violence in cities including San Francisco, Tacoma and Seattle. It is sometimes referred to as the War on the Docks. Fights took place between union members and replacement workers also known as scabs who were forced to run a gauntlet while strikers brutally beat them from either side. Crowds of teamsters and longshoremen also attacked scabs and strikebreakers in downtown using brass knuckles and two-by-fours. A company guard on one of the Elliott Bay piers shot and killed a striker. Newsreel footage of a riot in Tacoma has eerie similarities to images of todays demonstrations, as union members threw back canisters of tear gas tossed by heavily armed police. This short film is worth watching. The strike brought shipping to a standstill only one vessel managed to leave the Port of Seattle during the entire strike. A major battle occurred at Smith Cove, near the Magnolia Bridge, where strikers and police clashed. The police used mounted officers who were said to charge like cavalry with clubs and gas masks to run down strikers. The strike was eventually settled in arbitration.When protests turned violentAnti-war demonstrationsSeattle was a hotbed of opposition to the Vietnam War. Historian and Historylink.org co-founder Walt Crowley wrote in his memoir of the 60s, Rites of Passage, that Seattle ended the year 1969 with the dubious distinction of being the nations bombing capital, with some 69 explosions or arson fires. Though not all were politically motivated, many were. Anger boiled over again in May 1970 after the U.S. invasion of Cambodia, the killing of student protesters at Kent State in Ohio and, shortly after, the gunning down of students at Jackson State in Mississippi whose only crime was being Black. On May 1, some 1,000 demonstrators protested downtown, and an ROTC building on the University of Washington campus was vandalized. Other campus fires ensued. Students called for a strike, and 7,000 of them poured onto Interstate 5, moving from the University District toward downtown, blocking the freeway and infuriating drivers. The next day, 10,000 students blocked I-5 again and police fired tear gas. Over the next few days students were beaten in the U District by vigilantes, 15,000 marched on downtown and ongoing acts of vandalism, disruption and sabotage continued at the university. Crowleys book provides an extensive timeline of Seattle anti-war activity in this period and how it tracked with national events.Turtles and Teamsters at the 1999 WTO protestsIn November 1999, the World Trade Organization brought its major ministerial conference to Seattle, a pro-trade city. But for at least a year in advance, labor, environmental and other activists planned to use the occasion to shut down the WTO meeting through direct action to protest corporate globalization. Tens of thousands of protesters turned out along with thousands of delegates, government officials and representatives of worldwide nongovernmental organizations, or NGOs. On Nov. 30, marchers some 40,000 to 60,000 clogged downtown Seattle, gridlocking the city and leading to the successful shut down of the conference. At one point, drums filled the air, an anarchist marching band played and protesters carried huge paper puppets on their shoulders, while other dressed as endangered sea turtles, giving the protest a Woodstock charm. Then, the Seattle police decided to get tough and fired pepper gas and rubber pellets into a crowd blocking the intersection at Sixth Avenue and Union Street. Black-clad anarchists suddenly turned to smashing windows and setting dumpster fires. So began the so-called Battle of Seattle it even spawned a Hollywood movie by the name. Downtown was shut down, a state of emergency was declared, the National Guard was called in and arrests were made. In terms of size, it was the biggest mass protest in Seattle history, and burnished the citys reputation as a radical town, despite the prosperity it received from trade. The protest turned into a weeklong series of clashes between demonstrators and the police. Some anniversaries of the protests have repeated confrontations on a smaller scale. Protesters wave signs and shout slogans against the World Trade Organization, during a WTO meeting in Seattle, November 30, 1999. George P. Hickey/Washington State Historical Society Annual May Day parades Much of the anarchist energy of the Battle of Seattle was transferred into the next century, with annual parades and protests increasingly taken over by black-clad protesters intent on mayhem. It has now become a yearly event in which parades of progressives, union supporters and immigrant and social justice advocates are often overshadowed by media coverage of anarchist vandalism, property destruction and street battles with police. Eli Sanders of The Stranger wrote a piece about the evolution of May Day since 2012 that gives a good picture of what it has become.Yiannopoulos madnessIn 2017, a year into Donald Trumps presidency, a University of Washington Republican group invited a conservative provocateur and darling of the so-called alt-right, Milo Yiannopoulos, to speak at on campus. Yiannopoulos was a former editor of the right-wing website Breitbart. Protesters, including antifa, and others massed outside Kane Hall in Red Square, with crowds of Yiannopoulos supporters. Sparks flew, pushing and shoving and mini-melees occurred. Despite extensive police presence, an anti-fascist demonstrator was shot in an altercation with a conservative couple outside the venue. They claimed self-defense.Youth riotsAlki Beach riot of 1969Sometimes riots occur after sports events, parties or public events, or for no clear reason. Sometimes, people drink too much and decide to blow off steam. On Aug. 11, 1969, a disturbance occurred at a rock concert at Alki Beach in West Seattle, which escalated when people claimed police harassment. A Seattle Police Department vehicle was set ablaze as officers arrested two men drinking beer in the park. Hundreds in a crowd of some 2,000 youths brawled with police, who fought with clubs and gas that made people sick. Rocks were thrown and arrests were made in the three-hour fight. Complaints poured in over excessive force used by police, including the indiscriminate use of gas. Some canisters were fired into neighboring homes and groups of innocent bystanders.Eruption on The AveRight after the Alki blowup of 1969, the University District erupted over the course of two nights when hippies and teens ran wild in the streets, looting shops and fighting with cops. At one point a group of theatergoers, exiting a performance of a Shakespeare play, was engulfed in the wild scene, creating more chaos and confusion. Some rioters were angry with police harassment over drug use and possession in the U District. Rebellion against authority seemed to be a theme. Police said some of the same youths from Alki also rioted on the Ave. Among the arrest charges were littering, resisting arrest and using foul language. The riots became an issue in the mayors race, with Democrat Wes Uhlman urging full prosecution of ringleaders and Republican Ludlow Kramer advocating the creation of new youth programs.Mardi Gras mayhem of 2001A worse event, because it took a life, was the Mardi Gras riots in February 2001 in Pioneer Square. Some 2,000 partiers were out of control on Saturday, the first night of celebrations, throwing rocks and tussling with police. A bigger and more unruly crowd on Fat Tuesday took over Pioneer Square some 4,000 revelers and 350 police. Again the crowd got out of control, people were assaulted, rocks and bottles thrown, cars overturned, windows broken, and businesses vandalized and looted heres some graphic footage. A young man, Kristopher Kime, tried to rescue a woman in the melee and was beaten to death. The police broke it up with tear gas and batons. Scores were injured before the police took charge. They were criticized for not intervening in the riot sooner.This is by no means a comprehensive list of violent demonstrations, protest and riots, and it leaves out scores of systemic violence that occurred throughout the 19th and 20th century. This history is meant to look at moments during the regions urban era when the streets exploded in violence and destruction for a variety of reasons and causes.Blackpast.org, based in Seattle, is an excellent resource on African American history. For those interested in deep-diving on the history of race riots, for example, it offers a timeline that includes links to its articles on American events dating back to the 1600s. The website, founded by the University of Washington professor Quintard Taylor, covers the Pacific Northwest extensively, but is also international in scope. It is an invaluable resource, especially in these times.I also want to acknowledge the great work done by Seattles Historylink.org, which covers so much Northwest history so well, and the University of Washington, whose scholars and students have contributed much needed scholarship about our labor and civil rights history. The online resources of the Seattle Public Library are also a tremendous help for researchers. Finally,I want to shout out the the digital archives of the Washington State Historical Society, which allows free access to the public and provided some of the remarkable historic photographs, as did the digital collection of the Museum of History and Industry.These are just a few of the excellent resources that preserve and communicate our history, and which I have used in compiling parts of this article.Full disclosure: I have donated money to Blackpast, Historylink, the Seattle Library Foundation, and MOHAI, and am a member of the Washington State Historical Society Topics: Crime, History, Labor, Law & Justice, Media, Pacific Northwest, Race, Seattle & King County, Washington State

Coronavirus is still real. Protesters say they’re fighting a worse pandemic
06/05/2020 12:00am

I think it was more about whether that risk was justified, considering what we were seeing clearly with our own eyes, Thayer said referring to the video of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin pressing his knee into George Floyds neck.Id rather die as a result of catching the virus this way than because I had to go back to work, Thayer said of the protests.She tried her best to take precautions at the demonstrations, such as wearing a mask, but social distancing became impossible when police set off flash-bang grenades and sprayed tear gas into crowds.Thayer isnt alone. For the past week, thousands of protesters around the country have been weighing their passion for social justice with fears related to the coronavirus, whichhas killed more than 100,000 people in the U.S. Even some public health officials have said that, despite the COVID-19 pandemic, these protests are too important to skip.Crowds have been banned throughout COVID-19 because of the danger of spreading the virus. But there are other health concerns related to attending protests, such as the deleterious effect of tear gas. This is especially true for the elderly. Health officials have also warned those who are already sick should get tested and stay at home.Some advocates have officially expressed fear around the idea of protesting during the coronavirus threat. On the Friday protests first started in Seattle, Black Lives Matter Seattle-King County released a statement that may have come as a surprise to some.Our board of directors was initially conflicted about whether to boost these demonstrations, the advocacy group said in a statement. Ultimately, we decided that the situation is too dangerous for us to encourage greater attendance at these in-person protests.The statement pointed out that COVID-19 had already hit communities of color particularly hard. Here in King County, Latinos now account for 40 of COVID-19 cases, even though they make up only 13 of the population. African Americans have also been disproportionately affected.We refuse to encourage our community members to needlessly risk their lives and their health during this time when other avenues of action are available, the statement read.Zawadi Chege, a 20-year-old resident of Tacoma who just finished community college, said as a former student with limited funds, she couldnt think of other meaningful actions to participate in.I was really scared, and so was my mom, Chege said of the protest she attended in Tacoma. But I think its different being Black and undocumented. Ididnt feel like I had a choice.Black lives being murdered by policeor people who are supposed to protect usis not OK, Chege said.Chege layered on protection: gloves, a T-shirt turned into a makeshift mask and a bandana. Chege said her face was so covered in clothing that only her eyes were exposed. She also carried a backpack full of essentials, includinghand sanitizer.If I was going to be arrested, thats what I would want to be arrested for out of anything else, Chege said of attending the protest.Despite the apparent danger, many public health officials have encouraged participation indemonstrations during the pandemic. Infectious disease experts at the University of Washington circulatedan open letter supporting the proteststhat ultimately drew more than 1,200 signatures. Officials havenoted that standing up to police brutality means fighting an equally serious public health concern: racism.The actions of these police officers are unconscionable and so blatantly racist, the outrage is justified, Patty Hayes, director of Public Health Seattle & King County, said in a statement. We cant let COVID-19 distract us from our resolve.Let us join together in King County and show how it is possible to break down the historical institutional racism that affects our communities every day, Hayes said.Racism is a public health threat that cant be ignored, Washington state Health Secretary John Wiesman said in a statement. I want our Black community members and all people of color to know that the Department of Health is standing with you in solidarity, support and love. Demonstrators march along Interstate 5 during protests across downtown Seattle, May 30, 2020. A wave of protests have swept across the U.S. following the death of George Floyd. Minneapolis Police Department officer Derek Chauvin has been charged with his murder. Matt M. McKnight/Crosscut In a recent interview, Wiesman said it was too soon to tell whether the protests would lead to a rise in cases, but that the Department of Health is keeping an eye on the data. He added that public health officials should worry just as much about continued racial disparities in health care, such as Black babies having lower birth weights.This doesnt mean, however, that public officials think the large protest gatherings are completely safe. Simply that they recognize the public is making difficult choices.Many in our community grappled with attending protests to stand up against these injustices while also wanting to keep our community safe from further spread of COVID-19, officials atPublic Health Seattle & King County wrote on the Public Health Insider.Andy, a protester who is white and who identified himself only by his first name, said he, too, had concerns about the virus. Still, he went to the protest and placed his body in front of police so that African Americans and people of color would be less exposed to tear gas and other forms of possible retaliation.I felt it was OK because I was wearing my mask, but at that point I more or less stopped thinking about coronavirus, he said. But when the flash-bang grenades started going off, it became second priority to stay distant and more of a priority to just move with the group to get away from the explosions.I worry I put others at risk by going, Andy said in an email, but I also think that showing up in solidarity, instead of just angrily tweeting, was what felt most right.Andy said ultimately he feared looking back at this time with regret, knowing that he didnt show up to demonstrate solidarity when it mattered.Along with concerns over injuries caused by flash-bang grenades experts, such asSven-Eric Jordt, a professor at the Duke University School of Medicine, say the tear gas that police have deployed in Seattle and in other cities can cause chemical burns that allow for more efficient access for the virus.Im very concerned that large amounts of these aggressive chemicals are currently being used, Jordt said.Jordt said a 2014 military study showed the use of tear gas can cause serious enough lung damage to lead to higher rates of respiratory illnesses, such as influenza and other ailments similar to COVID-19. If someone is already sick and in a crowd, the tear gas could cause someone to cough and tear up, making the virus more likely to spread. Seattle & King County Public Health said it opposes the use of tear gas and other respiratory irritants based on the potential risk to increase COVID-19 spread. Autoplay video On Loop video On Mute video Off Show video controls On Another protester, whoidentified herself only by her first name, Tracy, said shes been out to the protests almost every night. During the pandemic, she and her boyfriend had been following all the public health guidelines. ThenFloyd died in police custody.If we get it and die from coronavirus fighting for peoples rights, were OK with that, said the 32-year-old Lynnwood resident, who works in retail. Tracy said America has allowed systemic racism to flourish for too long.Steve Baer, 34, a software engineer who lives in downtown Seattle, said he attended the protests because hes witnessed police brutality for decades.I grew up in Southern California during Rodney King, Baer said, referring to the Black man beaten by Los Angeles police in 1991. Ive seen this my entire life.Baer also feels as a tech employeehes contributed to Seattlesgrowing economic disparity.Baer said he heavily weighed the risks he was taking by joining a large crowd. He reasoned that before marching again he could self-quarantine for 14 days, since he works from home.The moment seemed too monumental for Baer to pass up. He tries to minimize the life regrets hell take with him to his deathbed, and not being part of the Black Lives Matter movement now could have been one of them.As we reopen, regardless, people are going to personally calculate risk-based decisions, Baer said. Its just if it matters enough to you. Topics: Coronavirus, Health, Law & Justice, Pacific Northwest, Seattle & King County, Washington State

Finally allowed to reopen, WA employers wonder: Now what?
06/04/2020 11:59pm

In the meantime, Lonergan-Dreke has spent countless hours helping those laid off workers apply for unemployment, sending letters and checking in with them over the phone.Sometimes it has seemed futile, as many of those laid ofhave struggled to get their benefits. One such employee, Jackie Cooke, was erroneously rejected from unemployment multiple times before finally receiving it and recentlyhas had payments halted once again.That has been horrendous, Longergan-Dreke said. The problems with unemployment,combined with record unemployment rates in Washington, give hera particularly alarming incentive to reopen.Like many small business owners, Longergan-Dreke is eager to put her workers back on her payroll, but at the same time she wonders how she can be sure she can afford to keep them.Why would we want to take someone off unemployment, have them receive PPP moneyand then in two months lay them off so they have to go through that nightmare again she said.An extinction-level eventThe state-ordered shutdowns willinevitablychange what business looks like after reopening. That transformation has already begun.The Main Street Alliance reports a quarter of the nations small businesses are in danger of permanent closure in the next five months.This is an extinction-level event for small businesses, said Amanda Ballantyne, the small business networks national director. She cited a failure in federal policy to create long-term solutions as one reason businesses are in this predicament PPP loans, for example, provide funding only for eight weeks.Tiffany Turner, owner of the regional hotel, inn and restaurant chain Adrift Hospitality, said that severely impacted businesses like hers will require long-term solutions to recover. Although some locations she owns were able to open recently, like one in Pacific County and another in Oregon, eathey arent anywhere near normal capacity and will likely be unable to reach those levels with current restrictions in place for the foreseeable future.This is not an eight-week issue in our economy, she said. There needs to be a much more certain fix.Since the coronavirus outbreak began, lawmakers have attempted to respond to the growing need for financial aid to businesses. In late March, the federal CARES Act established a pool of loans for businesses and tax credits, deferrals and deductions that would allow employers to hold on to the money they made.But those solutions were limited in scope. Now, with reopening dates in sight, Congress is considering a number of new proposals that would help businesses nationwide plan beyond a few weeks or months in recovery.Washingtons representatives and senators are focused on getting businesses the money they need to rehire and keep their employees, which would also would allow the workers to regain health insurance. Keeping those workers requires a stable source of funds, since employers need to know that theyll be able to pay them, and a lot of flexibility as businesses work to rehire staff in batches.Some have focused on reforming the PPP loan program after seeing inequities in its distribution. U.S. Rep. Suzan DelBene, D-Medina, wants to expand the CARES Acts payroll tax credit.That provision was designed to encourage employers to keep workers on their payroll by offering a refundable tax credit equal to 50 of up to $10,000 of an employees wages, so $5,000 per person. But originally, employers couldnt get the tax credit alongside a PPP loan. DelBenes proposal would change that, upping the credit to equal 80 of $15,000, allowing employers to receive up to $45,000 a year alongside other loans. DelBene says its a reliable solution, especially becauseuses preexisting relationships between the Internal Revenue Service and businesses.U.S. Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Seattle, has proposed thePaycheck Recovery Act, which would cover employee salaries up to $90,000, allowing employers to keep workers on a payroll even if the business hasnt reopened.The act follows the lead of relief legislation in countries like South Korea and the United Kingdom, which are giving businesses direct governmental support rather than requiring them to go through banks, as loans through the PPP do. Chris Evans, Jayapals communications director, said grants under the act could be renewed beyond the years end, possibly giving businesses more certainty in the future.The Woodland Park Zoo, which spends $2.5 million each month on upkeep and has received a PPP loan, has voiced support for Jayapals initiative. Its CEO, Alejandro Grajal, said theres little room to cut back on costsas many employees provide necessary care for the zoos animals. Hes concerned about thebudget going into next year. Regardless of any help the zoo has received or willreceive,2021 is looking very scary financially, he said,as the zoo has used savings from previous years to stay afloat.Were burning through cash, he said. The zoo will have to resize their budget in 2021, no matter what.In other relief legislation, U.S. Rep. Denny Heck, D-Olympia, has proposed $100 billion in emergency rental assistance. U.S. Rep. Derek Kilmer, D-Gig Harbor, is co-sponsoring a bill that would give Americans a job skills training credit of $4,000.Reopening day A reopening date for businesses has been elusive and frequently delayed since the pandemic began, but it now looks like it maysoon become a reality for parts of Washington. Some counties have already allowed certain businesses to reopen with restrictions some of Turners Adrift Hospitality locations have been approved to start receiving a limited number of guests but others, like two of Lonergan-Drekes Italian restaurants in Snohomish County, are still on hold.In the meantime, Cooke, the laid-off Lombardis employee,has been able to snag a few hours at the restaurantto assist with takeout, although she still hopes to receive the partial unemployment benefits shes eligible for. She said shes taking whatever she can get.Lonergan-Dreke said that shes been ready to reopen Lombardis since receiving a guideline for health protocols from the Washington Department of Health in mid-May. Shes anxiousto use up her PPP loan as well since she received it in mid-April, her time to use it runs out sometime in June unless Congress decides to expand the number of weeks beyond the eight that shes allowed to use those funds.Snohomish County has applied for approval to move on to Phase 2 of reopening and expects to hear back soon from state government. As they wait, Lonergan-Dreke and her staff have started updating their website to reflect new safety protocols at Lombardis and continue to prepare for a reopening day.With small businesses around the state closing permanently due to lost revenue, Lonergan-Dreke is hoping for good news someday soon.Its just carnage whats going on with small business, she said. Every day that were forced to stay closed is another day that a small business dies. Topics: Business, Changing Region, Coronavirus

Labor council to Seattle police union: Address racism or get out
06/04/2020 11:39am

SPOG must state that racism is an issue in law enforcement and within its own organization. The union must participate in workgroups focused on addressing racism in the union. It must commit to police contracts that do not evade accountability. And there must be consequences when professional standards are not followed and harm is done.Jane Hopkins, executive vice president of SEIU 1199, said she wants to hear the head of the union, Mike Solan, say, Black lives matter, and to mean it.The labor council is basically giving the police union one last opportunity to reform itself. SPOG has until June 17 to meet these demands, or the councilwill vote on whether to throw it out of the organization.The resolution, which was brought forward by health workers SEIU1199and grocery workers UFCW 21, also calls on Mayor Jenny Durkan to move swiftly and prioritize strong police accountability in the next round of labor negotiations with the union and to reconsider investments in law enforcement. It calls on City Attorney Pete Holmes to not prosecute protesters.The resolution is a dramatic turnaround for the labor council, which welcomed the police union into its ranks in late 2014 and had fought on its behalf ever since. Labor council representatives even hosted a press conference in 2018, calling on the Seattle City Council to ratify a new contract with the police union.But things have changed, said Nicole Grant, executive treasurer-secretary of the labor council. While she once believed bringing police into the labor movement would foster community engagement and reflection on racism, she now has her doubts.After what weve all experienced as a city over the last couple of weeks, do I feel as confident in that vision of everybody coming together and meeting at the level of our humanity and really changing things she said. As beautiful as that vision is, I find myself clinging to it less. I have an obligation to hear what community leaders are saying to the labor movement and to hear what Black union members are saying to the labor council and to be accountable to them and their vision.Protests have roiled Seattle for nearly a week, thrusting the issue of race and policing into the public narrative in a way not seen since at least the Ferguson, Missouri, protests of 2014, and perhaps never.The pressure is already having an effect. Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes said yesterday he would not ask to remove federal oversight of the Seattle Police Department.As the protests have swelled, so too have calls for the labor council to remove SPOG from its ranks.So long as theyre a part of the Martin Luther King County Labor Council, you will always have to be at SPOGs beck and call, Nikkita Oliver, a community leader and former candidate for mayor, said to a large crowd of protestersWednesday. We ask you to expel them.The Highline Education Association recently voted to call for SPOGs ouster from the labor council. A petitionfrom union members of colorhas garnered over 500 signatures and was delivered to the labor council Tuesday, said Isaura Jimenz Guerra, a White Center teacher and union member, who helped start the petition.Were worried about the ways in which a police union does not offer accountability for police officers but obscures and obstructs accountability for them, said Jimnez Guerra, adding that the police union should not be given more chances to improve, but removed immediately.Police unions which lean more conservative have long had a precarious relationship with the much more progressive labor community. Calls to separate the two are not new.These tensions are not new and exist everywhere in the country, said retired Judge Anne Levinson, who acted as auditor of the Seattle Police Departments accountability system for years.But as eyes turn toward police accountability, the role of police contracts has received new scrutiny and calls to disband their unions haveincreased.People are right to wonder why the police union views its role as protecting officers whove engaged in misconduct rather than seeing their role as helping to ensure that the public is treated with dignity, respect and fairness, Levinson said. Thats what the rest of the labor movement is about: how to improve the lives of the broadest cross-section of community as possible.In Seattle, the relationship between police and the labor community was uncommonly close. The police guild joined in 2014 on the urging of its former president, Ron Smith, and the ties grew closer when Kevin Stuckey, who is Black, took over as president.Stuckey made a show of advocating for labor causes outside of his own, including on behalf of new scheduling laws before the Seattle City Council and for nurses striking outside of Swedish hospital.In turn, he and his union received strong backing from the labor council in favor of their new contract.Stuckey, however, was swept out of his position earlier this year, losing his seat in a landslide to the more hardline Mike Solan, who is white. Grant said shes had only minimal contact with Solan since. Solan did not respond to a request for comment.Lisa Daugaard, executive director of the Public DefenderAssociation, said there was a hopeful period where it looked like the cooperation was producing good results.But by 2018 that tentative relationship was in the trash heap, she said. It seemed as though SPOG suddenly devalued the relationship with the civil rights community and retreated to a more traditional view of their own self-interest. It was sad to see the window for partnership close after so much effort.Hopkins of SEIU 1199, which represents medical health professionals, said she too was hopeful that the cooperation could bring the police union along toward self-reflection about racism and relationships with the community. But shes been dissatisfied, a feeling that hascrystalized for her in the past week. Shes hopeful the ultimatum will produce results, but she needs to be convinced.There needs to be a true change, said Hopkins, who is Black. The way to do that is actually accepting that yes, we are a racist organization and we are going to do what we can to make sure we dismantle that in our organization. SPOG was slated to begin new negotiations with the city in April, although they have delayed that start. As Seattle and the police department continue to limp forward under the eyes of a federal judge, the results of that bargaining have taken on new significance. If the next contract doesnt include strong enough accountability measures, neither the public nor the judge will be pleased.Looking back on the labor councils advocacy for SPOGs contract, Grant said she has second thoughts even regret.I know it seems like a dramatic change of course, said Grant. And it is. It is a dramatic change of course. Topics: Labor, Law & Justice, Race, Seattle & King County

El Siete Dias
El Siete Dias

12005 NE 12th St
Bellevue, WA 98005   Directions

(425) 646-8846

Website

Abril periodico 2020
01/18/2016 4:06am

Directorio 2020
01/18/2016 4:06am

Clasificados
01/18/2016 3:59am

KCTS-TV
KCTS-TV

401 Mercer St
Seattle, WA 98109   Directions

(206) 728-6463

Website

KIRO-TV
KIRO-TV

2807 3rd Ave
Seattle, WA 98121   Directions

(206) 728-7777

Website

KOMO-TV
KOMO-TV

140 4th Ave N
Seattle, WA 98109   Directions

(206) 404-4079

Website

KSTW-TV / CW 11
KSTW-TV / CW 11

1000 Dexter Ave N
Seattle, WA 98109   Directions

(206) 441-1111

Website

Burden of Truth – “Desperate Measures”
06/05/2020 11:40am

KODIE MAKES A MOVE THAT COULD JEOPARDIZE HER CASEKodieSera-Lys McArthur makes a bold move regarding her children. Desperate to help her friend, Joanna KristinKreuk recalls a memory from her past that could be useful to the current case. Meanwhile, Billy Peter Mooney meets another mom with a story to tell. Kelly Makin directed the episode

In the Dark – “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Dying”
06/05/2020 11:40am

FRIENDS WITH BENEFITS When MurphyPerryMattfeldand FelixMorgan Krantzconcoct a new plan to destroy Niaguest star NickiMicheaux, Murphys friendship with JoshTheodore Bhatproves to be more beneficial than she expected.In need of some space from Murphy, JessBrooke Markhammakes a bold move with Sterlingguest star NatalieLiconti. DeanRich Sommerruns into issues at work, and MaxCasey Deidrickgets an unexpected visitor. ClaraAranovichdirected

Inside: The 100 “False Gods”
06/05/2020 11:02am

Go behind the scenes of The 100s episode The Garden. Executive Producers Jason Rothenberg and Kim Shumway break down pivotal scenes from the episode Tune in Wednesday at 8pm on CW11 Seattle for new episodes of The 100

Inside: DC’s Legends of Tomorrow “Swan Thong”
06/05/2020 10:59am

Get a behind the scenes look at the latest DCs Legends of Tomorrow episode with Executive Producers Grainne Godfree and Keto Shimizu

The 100 – “Hesperides”
06/04/2020 12:25pm

OUTSIDERS Mysterious outsiders arrive with news of Clarkes Eliza Taylor missing people. Bob Morley, MarieAvgeropuolos, Lindsey Morgan, Richard Harmon,TasyaTeles, Shannon Kook, JR Bourne, Shelby Flannery andChukuModualso star. Diana Valentine directed the episode written by Sean Crouch 704. Original airdate 6/10/2020 8pm.

KUNS-TV
KUNS-TV

140 4th Ave N
Seattle, WA 98109   Directions

(206) 404-6684

Website

Puget Sound Business Journal
Puget Sound Business Journal

801 2nd Ave
Seattle, WA 98104   Directions

(206) 876-5500

Website

Adriane Brown joins Axon board of directors
06/05/2020 7:03pm

Police body camera and taser maker Axon Enterprise Inc. has expanded its board of directors with the addition of a long-time venture capital and technology sector executive.Arizona-based Axon Nasdaq: AAXN said this week it added Adriane Brown as an independent board director, effective May 30, following a six-month executive search.Brown has been a partner at Seattle-based venture capital firm Flying Fish Partners since November 2018. She previously was president and chief operating officer

Patti Payne's Cool Pads: Clyde Hill home was a rare find for these collectors
06/05/2020 6:00pm

Brady and Mindy Hill are selling their one-of-a-kind Northwest contemporary manse in the Mercia section of Clyde Hill for $7.78 million. HomeSmart Real Estate Associates Broker Cat Flynn has the listing. Brady Hill is CEO and co-owner Renton-based Greensource, one of the countrys largest T-shirt printing companies. But his hobby, collectible baseball cards, dates back to when he was a kid. He used the valuable collection to buy his first car and to pay his way through college. It has grown

UPS beware, Amazon just increased its air fleet by 17%
06/05/2020 5:07pm

Amazons infrastructure has seen explosive demand during the Covid-19 pandemic. If I were UPS right now, Id be scared out of my living daylights, says a former head of Amazon Services.

Sea-Tac Airport's recovery inches ahead as some foreign carriers resume flights
06/05/2020 4:46pm

One analyst said airlines are seeing demand rising among leisure travelers seeking who seek two types of destinations and the Puget Sound region offers both.

While cutting costs companywide, Expedia reinvests in travel industry recovery
06/05/2020 4:45pm

Advertising funds, job training and a recovery data dashboard are a few elements of Expedias partner recovery plan.

Seattle Business Monthly
Seattle Business Monthly

1518 1st Ave S
Seattle, WA 98134   Directions

(206) 284-1750

Website

Seattle Post-Intelligencer
Seattle Post-Intelligencer

2901 3rd Ave
Seattle, WA 98121   Directions

(206) 448-8030

Website

The Falcon
The Falcon

3210 4th Ave W
Seattle, WA 98119   Directions

(206) 281-2913

Website

The Seattle Medium
The Seattle Medium

2600 S Jackson St
Seattle, WA 98144   Directions

(206) 323-3070

Website

Black Lives Matter Seattle-King County Announces Statewide March And General Strike
06/06/2020 8:43pm

Black Lives Matter Seattle-King County BLM announced that they are organizing a statewide march and general strike next Fri., June 12.The post Black Lives Matter Seattle-King County Announces Statewide March And General Strike appeared first on The Seattle Medium.

Amid Protest, Black Lives Matter Members Working Behind The Scenes To Affect Change
06/05/2020 8:36pm

We recognize that protesting is a tool, a powerful demonstration of collective communication. But When using this tool, we must also consider the question, what will we gain from protesting We want to be strategic, leveraging every ounce of effectiveness from the investment of time, talent, treasure, and risk to physical safety.The post Amid Protest, Black Lives Matter Members Working Behind The Scenes To Affect Change appeared first on The Seattle Medium.

Inslee Issues Guidance On Allowing Youth And Recreational Sports To Restart
06/05/2020 5:38pm

In a memo outlining the guidelines for allowing youth sports and recreational adult activities, Inslee said that after consulting with stakeholders, we have developed Professional Sporting Activities, and Phase 2 and 3 Sporting Activities COVID-19 Requirements.The post Inslee Issues Guidance On Allowing Youth And Recreational Sports To Restart appeared first on The Seattle Medium.

Former Seattle Black Community Festival President Michael Taylor Passes
06/05/2020 3:46pm

Taylor served as the President of the Pacific Northwest Black Community Festival Association. His mission was to strengthen Seattles Black Community through mentorship, entrepreneurship, networking and education. His message was If we dont think about the future, we wont have one.The post Former Seattle Black Community Festival President Michael Taylor Passes appeared first on The Seattle Medium.

State Approves County’s Plan To Allow Limited Opening Of Businesses
06/05/2020 1:55pm

s of today, restaurants and retailers will be allowed to serve customers in their establishments, in addition to other modified openings for a wide range of businesses and activities. The post State Approves Countys Plan To Allow Limited Opening Of Businesses appeared first on The Seattle Medium.

The Seattle Times
The Seattle Times

1000 Denny Way
Seattle, WA 98109   Directions

(206) 464-2111

Website

Players suspended for 6 months for breaking virus curfew
06/06/2020 8:09pm

BEIJING AP The Chinese Football Association says six members of the national under-19 have been suspended for six months for violating coronavirus control measures by leaving training camp at midnight to go drinking. The 35-player training camp in Shanghai began on May 17 and ended Saturday. It was a severe violation of the teams

AP PHOTOS: Massive protests punctuate a week in the streets
06/06/2020 7:29pm

They held up signs and their fists and the memory of George Floyd. Tens of thousands of protesters marched worldwide in what could be the biggest one-day mobilization against racial injustice since a white Minneapolis police officer pressed a knee into Floyds neck for several minutes. Even after a week of the most significant protests

Sato misses IndyCar season opener after crash practice
06/06/2020 7:21pm

FORT WORTH, Texas AP Takuma Sato missed the delayed season-opening IndyCar race after his team wasnt able to get the car repaired in time for the green flag Saturday night after a crash in qualifying. Sato got high into Turn 1 on the high-banked Texas Motor Speedway on the start of his qualifying run,

Tensions ebb as cities worldwide hold peaceful protests
06/06/2020 7:20pm

Demonstrators filled the streets in cities around the world Saturday, staging some of the largest and most peaceful protests against racism since a 46-year-old black man, George Floyd, was killed on Memorial Day after a Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck. People marched in Washington, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, London, Berlin, Paris, Sydney and elsewhere,

Honor A. P. wins Santa Anita Derby
06/06/2020 7:16pm

ARCADIA, Calif. AP Honor A. P. won the $400,000 Santa Anita Derby by 2 3/4 lengths Saturday to move into the Kentucky Derby picture. Ridden by Hall of Famer Mike Smith, Honor A. P. ran 1 1/8 miles in 1:48.97 and paid $6.40, $2.60 and $2.20. It was Smiths third straight win and fourth

Page Sponsor

Rudolf Birkenkopf Agency
  • • Auto & Vehicle
  • • Home & Renters
  • • Life & Health
(206) 286-8516
Directions Website
View More Info

Explore Seattle

AttractionsDate IdeasEducationFestivalsGolf CoursesGovernmentHidden TreasuresHospitalsLocal NewsLocal Sports NewsMoviesMuseumsMusic & TheaterNational Entertainment NewsNational NewsNational Sports NewsNightlifeOutdoorsRadio StationsShoppingSportsToursTransportationUtilitiesWeather