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Public health cynics hated pandemic interventions in 1918, too
05/28/2020 12:00am

Historian Nancy Rockafellar, writing about the flu pandemic in a 1986 Pacific Northwest Quarterly article, In Gauze We Trust, looked at public attitudes following the epidemic. The public, she wrote, resisted regulative zeal on the part of public health officials. Science had not understood influenza enough to prevent catastrophic losses. As a result, The devastating epidemic had seriously dimmed postwar optimism and faith in the application of progressive medical science. Despite scientific advances and a greater medical community commitment to public health, the concept and actual well-being of society suffered a stunning defeat in the immediate aftermath of World War I, she concluded.Read the rest of Knute Bergers ongoing series on the impacts of the 1918 flu in the Pacific Northwest.Selling public health in the early 20th century had been an uphill struggle the more it was applied. Some people resisted any interference in their lives, even in the name of public health. In 1911, Dr. Eugene Porter, New Yorks state health commissioner, succinctly articulated the challenge of trying to overcome public resistance to changing behavior in order to stop preventable diseases: Blocking our way stand the troops of selfishness and ignorance. These are always the twin foes of progress.To that end, Washingtons public health officials worked to gain support for their work even before the pandemic. Typhoid, diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, smallpox all demanded attention, as did water quality and sanitation. State inspectors traveled Washington to track down the sources of disease, test milk, inspect logging camps and test samples in a state laboratory designed for the purpose. In the war years, venereal or social diseases had become rampant. Tuberculosis was an ongoing problem. Both VD and TB were often treated by segregating patients from the rest of society.Both World War I-era state health commissioners, Dr. Thomas D. Tuttle of Seattle and his successor, Dr. John B. Anderson of Spokane, had battled the flu pandemic and both likened the financing of the states public health efforts to war. In a typescript report on public health to Washington Gov. Louis F. Hart in 1920, Anderson wrote, Our citizens are willing to be taxed for protection against an armed foe who would invade our homes and openly destroy life and property, but it is very difficult for me to comprehend why people are unwilling to pay relatively small sums for doing those things that will save from death many who might perish from microscopic enemies. Anderson recommended that the state buy and provide a diphtheria antitoxin free to the public. As it was, it was free only to the poor and cheap for the rich, but unaffordable to the vast middle. Dr. Thomas D. Tuttle Washington State Archives/Medical license record Anticipating the rough circumstances for selling public health to the Legislature and citizens around the state, Tuttle used his 1915-1916 Biennial State Health Report to compose what amounted to a public health manifesto arguing for funding, acceptance and education. He invoked thinkers such as author and critic John Ruskin and philosopher Herbert Spencer to bolster his case.First, Tuttle identified the enemy by quoting from Spencer a passage popular among public health advocates in the late 19th century: Ignorant men may sneer at the pretentions of sanitary science weak and timorous men may hesitate to commit themselves to its principles, so large is their affliction selfish men may shrink from the labor of change, which its recognition must entail and wicked men may turn indifferently from considering that which concerns the health and happiness of millions of their fellow creatures. Spencer went on to say that public health work was the essence of Christian behavior.Having set the battle lines between modern medicine and the ignorant, timid and wicked, Tuttle then argued for economic pragmatism. In preventable diseases we have for reflection a condition of urgent economic importance. They are destructive to efficient manpower are unnecessary and can be restrained, and possibly entirely suppressed. Lack of health, in other words, was bad for business.Even so, selling the idea was not going to be easy. Our efforts at control will meet with opposition opposed on the ground that we are restraining the individual from exercising his right of liberty, Tuttle wrote. He dismissed such arguments: Any claim to vested rights to liberty which disregards the neighbors vested rights to liberty is properly catalogued as despotic selfishness. In other words, your mask or quarantine or vaccination protects the liberty of the whole community. Dont Tread on Me doesnt give one the right to tread on others by exposing them to disease.Tuttle also argued that there was a larger, more long-lasting obligation. He leaned on biblical notions to support his case that public health is pro-life: We are willingly taxing ourselves for every commodity in daily use that the war burden may not fall upon the babes of the next, or the next and yet the next generation This is proof of the working of a sub-conscious law of fair play which avouches the right of the unconceived child to be represented before the bar of equity concerning economic measures. I contend that the unborn child has the same right to be protected from sociological, environmental and disease producing conditions. A true bill or indictment would lie against any forbears who neglected to hand down a heritage of good health, and it is well to remember that the sins of the fathers are visited upon the children even unto the third and fourth generation. Tuttle saw public health as protecting the rights of people yet to come, a similar argument made today by environmentalists regarding climate change.Despite his articulate passion, Tuttle was fired from his job in early 1919 after steering the state through the worst of the Spanish flu pandemic. The trigger was politics defiant Olympia and Thurston County doctors who opposed further shutdowns and he left the state shortly after. His successor, Anderson, who was the chief health officer and physician in Spokane before and during the flu epidemic, was appointed as Tuttles replacement. Faced with writing his first state-of-the-state health report in early 1920, Anderson lifted nearly all of Tuttles manifesto with a few additional paragraphs of his own to make his argument for a bigger budget, better pay for health commission staff, and more funding to sell the idea of public health to the general public. Dr. John B. AndersonSpokane Chronicle, 1916 Anderson also picked up Tuttles notion of responsibility to the future, as newspapers of the time noted that he gave lectures on the Responsibility to Posterity to various civic and health groups around the state. But by 1921 he too was fired, the health commission reorganized, and its budget, at least temporarily, reduced. When asked by the Spokesman-Review about leaving the job, the paper reported Anderson would not discuss the change in the management of state health affairs beyond expressing the belief that politics has nothing to offer a professional man. Anderson also left the state for work, it was reported, with the U.S. Public Health Service.This brings to mind a quote attributed to John Ruskin that both Tuttle and Anderson included in their reports, which perhaps reflects the frustration public health officials felt in the face of opposition: Any regulations which tend to improve the health of the masses are viewed by them as an unwarranted interference with their vested rights in inevitable disease and death.The quote, used in arguments promoting public health at the turn of the century, was sometimes said to be meant cynically or sarcastically. Yet, by invoking it, Washingtons public health officials were laying a moral marker for policies designed to not only help the living, but to fulfill a duty to the coming generations even if many of their fellow citizens in the present resist treatment. Topics: 1918 Flu, Coronavirus, History

WA churches make do praying in cars amid Trump's push to reopen
05/28/2020 12:00am

Its been tough not being able to get together. Drive-in services help you cope with everything that is going on, Korets said.A lot of people are so anxious about life, said the six-month member of Timberlake Church, based in the suburban city east of Lake Washington that is home to Microsoft. Being closed up, alone, its difficult for people.Korets, who lives in Snohomish, said she believes communities should have the freedom to not only make their own decisions about whether to hold alternative church services that limit social interactions, but reopen more fully. Worship services help people by offering them a chance to pray and hand the burdens they carry with them over to God, she said.But for now, drive-in service would have to do.All around the Seattle region, church members and religious leaders have tried to sidestep the heated argument about whether houses of worship should be allowed the freedom to open the doors to the faithful by avoiding the debate and opting for socially distanced methods, such as praying over Zoom and holding drive-in services. Debbie Anderson of Lake Stevens listens to the sermon from her car during a drive-in church service at The Grove Church in Marysville on May 24. Anderson has been a member of the church for 25 years and said she is thankful to be able to get out of the house and still come to church. More on religion and COVID-19: Ramadan during crisis is an opportunity to help.Further north, in Marysville,Pastor Ryan Loffer led a drive-inservice over the weekend at The Grove Church. Like others on Sunday, Loffer wrestled with the question of returning to work full time.I love my wife, and I love my kids, but on the issue of work Im ready to go back to the office. It is hard, Loffer said during his sermon. The stress temperature, the heat has been turned up for so many of us.Loffer cautioned there are no easy answers. On this topic of church and should we be meeting together, Loffer began. Dont let it, wherever youre at, dont let that become a dividing factor. We are in this together.On Friday, President Donald Trump reignited the religious debate some had managed to avoid by threatening to overrule governors who refuse to allow houses of worship to reopen in the midst of the pandemic.Some governors have deemed the liquor stores and abortion clinics as essential, but have left out churches and other houses of worship, Trump said. Its not right. So I am correcting this injustice and calling houses of worship essential.In America, we need more prayer, not less, Trump concluded. The welcome sign for a drive-in church service at The Grove Church in Marysville on May 24. Trump and other members of the White House staff insisted churches everywhere could reopen safely that very weekend because the Centers for Disease Control and Preventionhad issued guidance for communities of faith, suggesting limits on sharing religious objects, choir singing and other measures.Some faith leaders immediately pushed back on the idea that church services could safely resume and that they should ignore local guidance issued by governors. Washington state Catholic bishops released a statement noting that Masswould continue to be suspended out of our deepest respect for human life.As disciples of Jesus, we are called to be instruments of Gods protection for the vulnerable and the public common good, the letter read. Our love of God and neighbor is always personal and not partisan. The bishops indicated that they would continue to work closely with Gov. Jay Inslee on a plan to hold Mass again. Tanya Korets looks at her Bible in her car during a drive-in church service at Timberlake Church in Redmond on May 24. Masih Fouladi, executive director ofCAIR Washington, responded even more forcefully to Trumps suggestion, saying Muslims will not follow the lead of a president who suggests injecting people with disinfectants and who refuses to follow basic CDC guidelines like wearing a mask in public.Our faith teaches us that to harm one life is like harming the whole world and that to save one life is like saving the whole world, Fouladi said.But other religious leaders have embraced Trumps directive. Under growing pressure, public officials have also changed their minds about church gatherings. On Saturday, Minnesota announced that it would lift restrictions and allow houses of worship to open at 25of capacity. Catholic and Lutheran leaders had previously indicated they would defy Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz if church services were not allowed to resume.On Wednesday, Gov. Inslee announced that counties in Phase 1 willbe allowed to hold outdoor services for up to 100 people wearing face coverings as long as they observephysical distancing. Indoor services at 25 of capacity, or fewer than 50 individuals, whichever is less,can resume at churches in counties in Phase 2. Spiritual services in private homesare allowed for groups made up of no morethan five people.I do want to encourage people if they can continue their creative ways of congregating that have been successful for them already, that would be great, Inslee added.Lawsuits have also been filed in various states, demanding that faith leaders be granted the First Amendment right to practice their religion. Here in Washington, four Republican lawmakers sued Inslee in early May, saying their right to worship had been harmed. In April, Republican gubernatorial candidate Joshua Freed filed a similar lawsuit, targeting Inslees ban on spiritual gatherings. Worship songs are led from the roof during a drive-in church service at The Grove Church in Marysville on May 24. Alicia Pinorini listens to the sermon with her 3-year-old daughter from her car during a drive-in church service at The Grove Church in Marysville on May 24. Pinorini has been a member for eight months and said she thinks churches should reopen with strict guidelines. Its been long enough, she said. The reopening of churches has already had consequences in some places. At least two churches in Georgia and Texas that reopened earlier promptly shut down again in May after some worshippers tested positive for the coronavirus. In Texas, the reclosing came after a priest at Holy Ghost Catholic Church in Houston died from what was believed to be COVID-19.And a recent report from the CDC documented how a coronavirusoutbreak in a rural Arkansas church spread from a pastor and his wife to 35 attendees, killing three.In April, a Virginia pastor who defied stay-at-home orders died of COVID-19. The death of Gerald O. Glenn was announced during an Easter sermon.And here in Washington state, a choir practice at Mount Vernon Presbyterian Church unknowingly infected 53 people in early March, leading to the deaths of two people, highlighting the danger that might lurk in common and seemingly benign church activities. The CDC has called choir practices potential superspreaders because of opportunities for droplet and fomite transmission.The act of singingitselfmight have contributed to transmission through emission of aerosols, which is affected by loudness of vocalization, the CDC said.Back at Timberlake Church, Pastor Shane McCroskey complained of a lot of mixed messages coming in from the federal government and local leaders like Inslee. I get it, its evolving, McCroskey said. Were just trying to move slowly.Timberlake members John and Brita Grotte spoke about the difficulty of finding the right balance between keeping people safe and meeting the needs of the faithful. Members of the congregation listen to the sermon from their car during a drive-in church service at The Grove Church in Marysville on May 24. Brita, an emergency room nurse at EvergreenHealth, said she sees at work the repercussions of not following social distancing guidelines.I think we should look to people who have bigger degrees than we do, Brita said when asked whether churches should resume services. But she and her partner also expressed concerns about mental health challenges going ignored.Alicia Pinorini, a 37-year-old stay-at-home mom from Lake Stevens, said she welcomed the opportunity that drive-in services in Redmond offered her to get out of the house. But Pinorini said social distancing had been happening long enough and that churches should be allowed to reopen, as long as safety guidelines were in place. I dont see the harm in that, she said.Inslee has said King County is not yet ready to move on to Phase 2 of reopening because there has not been a two-week decline in coronavirus cases, among other factors.Lindsey and D.J. Neyens, members of The Grove Church for about five years, said drive-in services offer a little resemblance of normalcy.But D.J., a 36-year-old firefighter, warned that while the Bible teaches Christians to gather and pray, showing the Lords love to one another sometimes involves discernment.Its about How can we do the most good for everybody he said. Children sit on top of their car as prerecorded worship songs are played from a screen in the parking lot during a drive-in church service at Timberlake Church in Redmond on May 24. Topics: Coronavirus, Health, Religion

Canvassing via computer screen: a 2020 candidate’s election challenge
05/27/2020 11:59pm

Its not just a means of campaigning, but also helping the kids get excited about science, said Walsh, who owns Sub Zero Nitrogen Ice Cream in Federal Way. Heis challenging state Rep. Jesse Johnson, a Democrat who was appointed earlier this year.Typically, knocking on doors and meeting voters face to face is a key part of successful campaigning especially for positions like city council member and state legislator, which dont generate as much publicity and money as federal or statewide races.But, as has been the case with so many other things, the new coronavirus has halted that type of retail politics, both in Washington state and around the country.More on politics and COVID-19: Ask Gov. Inslee about the states coronavirus response.For candidates, time is running out to appeal to voters before the Aug. 4 primary, which will decide which two candidates for each position advance to the general election in November.Johnson, Walshs opponent, has also been experimenting with new ways of campaigning. The former Federal Way City Council member has been hosting online question-and-answer sessions focused on COVID-19, while broadcasting the forums to his constituents via Facebook Live.In recent weeks, Johnson has interviewed school officials about how the coronavirus crisis is affecting education, and has discussedpublic health issues with Dr. Ben Danielson, the senior medical director of Seattle Childrens Odessa Brown Childrens Clinic.People chime in and ask questions of myself or my guests on the show, said Johnson, who represents the 30th Legislative District. Its a great way to talk with people directly. Democratic state Rep. Jesse Johnson, left, delivers food to people in his Federal Way-area district on May 22. Joining him is Keenan Curran, a mentor with the Christian organization Young Life. Johnson said he is not doing traditional door-to-door campaigning due to the COVID-19 crisis. Jesse Johnson campaign Seferiana Day, a political consultant who works with Democrats, said that in many ways, the increased emphasis on online campaigning has made it easier for people to participate in local politics.The virus has changed everything, Day said, but it has also made us realize we can be flexible and make things work.Last week, for instance, the 37th Legislative District Democrats held a meeting to endorse candidates, something the group does every election season. Normally, such a meeting would be considered extremely large if 150 people showed up, said Stephen Reed, the organizations chair.But last week, more than 250 people logged on throughZoom, the online meeting platform, to hear local candidates speak and decide which ones the group should endorse.If that same meeting were held in person, Our room wouldnt even fit that many, Reed said.I do think it is hard for folks to get to the physical meetings sometimes, Reed said. Since most everyone is stuck at home right now, its much easier to get an audience online.Still, theres the issue of raising money. Many in-person fundraisers have been struckfrom this years calendar.With fundraising events unable to proceed as they normally would, candidates are swapping house parties for Zoom calls in which they can make a socially distanced pitch for donations.John Wyble, a Democratic political consultant, said Zoom fundraisers lack the social aspect of in-person political events.The truth is, people who are active in politics go to events not just to meet and talk to the candidates they want to meet and talk to everybody else, too, Wyble said. Thats kind of a crucial element of political fundraising. And thats whats missing in a Zoom event.Even so, Wyble said one of his candidates, former state Rep. Kristine Reeves, has had some success raising money through Zoom meet-and-greets. Reeves is one of several people runningto replace retiring U.S. Rep. Denny Heck, D-Olympia, in Congress.Given the limitations of Zoom get-togethers, traditional phone calls remain an important way of soliciting campaign donations. But because of the global crisis, the nature of those calls has fundamentally changed, multiple political consultants said.For the first month of the pandemic, it wasnt even appropriate to ask for money, said Kevin Carns, executive director of the Reagan Fund, which supports Republican state House candidates.The first round, all we were doing was offering resources, Carns said. That included telling people how they could file for unemployment and how to reach their local health department, he said.We werent talking aboutthe Democrats raise taxes, vote for us, because it would have been really tone deaf to do that at that time, Carns said.On the flip side, people are actually picking up the phone more nowadays, candidates said.Normally, Johnson said he would expect only about 15 to 20 of his campaign phone calls to go to a person instead of a voicemail box.Now when he calls to check in with people,he ends up talking to someone closer to 50 of the time.People are home, and they want to talk because theyre bored, Johnson said. Kirsten Harris-Talley, a Democratic candidate for state representative, speaks at a May 18 meeting of the 37th Legislative District Democrats, which was conducted via Zoom. More than 250 people attended the groups virtual endorsement meeting. Laura Van Tosh, Precinct Committee Officer No. 1896 Initiative campaigns face different challenges. The July 2 deadline for submitting signatures to qualify an initiative for the November ballot is fast approaching.Yet right now, signature gatherers are unlikely to approach voters in person to urge them to sign petitions, given the public-health guidelines that recommend staying at least 6feet away from others.Those limitations have caused ballot-measure campaigns to rely more heavily on other tactics, including asking voters to sign petitions and return them by mail.Crystal Fincher, a political consultant working on a ballot measure called Treatment First Washington, said the campaign is partnering with community organizations to help get the word out about the initiative. The ballot measure, officially known as Initiative 1715, would decriminalize low-level drug possession, referring people to drug treatment programs instead of arresting them. It would also increase funding for treatment.Fincher said that when it comes to community outreach, it makes sense to team up with organizations that are already offering valuable services on the ground, and notreinventthe wheel.In a similar vein, some politicians are also connecting with voters through community service, such as by delivering food to peoples homes.Twice a week, Johnson volunteers to help bring food to community members who need it. He said this allows him to have meaningful interactions with constituents from a safe distance.When they see that their representative is showing up with food at their door, I get a chance to have conversations albeit from 10 feet away, Johnson said.Walsh, the Republican candidate, said he hopes his ice-cream-making videos also help the communityin their own way. He has done the presentations in-person before at local schools, but this is the first year he has put them online.With the current situation with a lot of kids at home, as well as a lot of adults at home, we thought it would be a great opportunity to bring some education out to you, in your homes or wherever you are at, Walsh said during one of his Facebook Live sessions in late March.He then poured liquid nitrogen into a bowl, the white vapor swirling around him, and added a balloon and gummy bears as he explainedthe scientific method.By the lessons end, he had shown his audience how to freeze milk, cream and sugar into raspberry ice cream.Day, the Democratic political consultant, said she expects that more campaigns will continue to incorporate Facebook Live and other digital tools into their strategy in the future, now that they have seen how effective they can be at engaging voters.It really is about being available, Day said. So much of it right now is showing up online every week just having a dialogue and taking questions, and not being afraid to really be accountable to people. Topics: Coronavirus, Election 2020, Elections, Seattle & King County, Washington Legislature, Washington State

‘Extremophile’ scientist trades Antarctica for COVID-19 research
05/27/2020 11:58pm

Article continues below Related Stories Now inadvertently trapped with her parents at their home in Gig Harbor since March 6, Hastings is finding ways to put her expertise in field work, immunology and virology to work in Seattle in the name of a public health crisis. This time, instead of sampling for traces of microbes in remote locations, shes helping to detect the prevalence of the novel coronavirus on surfaces of the urban cityscape.Off the grid and into a pandemicHastings had been offline with no contact to the outside world since Feb. 1 as a research scientist on a project swabbing the highest-trafficked parts of Antarctica for evidence of human microflora through herxO.Lab initiativein collaboration with colleagues at Cornell Universitys Weill Cornell Medical College. Before that, she spent two weekscommanding an all-female mock space mission on the side of Hawaiis Mauna Loa volcano.As soon as her team pulled its vessel into port in Ushuaia, Argentina, on Feb. 23, emails and social media notes from friends and family started pouring in with rumors about something that was emerging out of China. The vessels permanent crew failed to find a willing port before sailing back to the Netherlands.As someone who travels quite frequently, I imagined this would quickly become a global issue that to me was readily apparent, she said. What I did not yet foresee was just how transmissible this virus is, and how quickly it would spread.Hastings reached New York, where she is based, on Feb.27,just in time for a week of meetings with CornellsMetaSub International Consortium an urban microbiome mapping project that swabs transportation hubs around the world for microscopic life. The aim isto create a profile of the life around us and better understand how we interact with it. J.J. Hastings takes a selfie whilst sailing back into the Beagle Channel at the end of her voyage to Antarctica. She served as the Expeditionary Scientist on a sailing voyage to Antarctica taking environmental samples along the way to study microbial flora found in the South Shetland Islands and Graham Land. J.J. Hastings I am intrigued with and drawn to a systemic way of understanding our environment, viruses and their evolution in particular, she says of her two-year involvement with the project. For one, we are outnumbered many times over by the microbial life on this planet. Its some of the most ancient, diverse and extraordinary life in its different manifestations and I appreciate that theres so little that we understand about them so far.While the consortium has been taking censuses of microscopic life for three years, Hastings came back to the lab just as the first coronavirus cases popped up in Seattle. Her adviser and MetaSub principalinvestigatorDr. Christopher Masonsays he and his colleaguesrealized in January that they had the infrastructure in place to start swabbingfor evidence of the coronavirus on high-touch surfaces around the world, and they decided to pivot.I was dropping off the equipment I had to take with me to Antarctica, and suddenly, literally, like a day or two later, it was Hey, lets take this out into the New York City subway and see if we can detect the presence of viral RNA in New York transport, says Hastings. She grabbed anair sampler she had just used in Antarcticaand, with a few colleagues, took the subway to Times Square to do the very first rounds of coronavirus-focused surface swabs and air filtration.The swabbing process is a simple, leave-no-trace endeavor. Scientists swab high-touch surfaces turnstiles, ticket machines, guard rails with a sterile swab, then put the swab in a buffer that sterilizes and inactivates any DNA and RNA it might have picked up, making it safe for storage and transportation. To evaluate things over time, the scientists swab surfaces every other day to see if viral RNA is accumulating. Most importantly, theyre looking for the presence of the virus. If they do see evidence of it,they canthen advise people in that location on how to disinfect properly andbetter respond to the virus through personal actions and public health or business-specific efforts, Hastingssays. Clockwise from left, Science Officer Dr. Adriana Bachowicz, Vice Commander Erin Bonilla, Communications Officer Dr. Sian Proctor andHabitat Operations Officer US Air Force 2nd Lt. Makiah Eustice wave at J.J. Hastings, who is inside the HI-SEAS habitat, during an experiment to simulate life on Marsin Hawaii on January 2020. During the two-week-longmission, Hastings and her colleagues researched the microbial flora present in the habitat,as well as those in the lava tubes outside of the habitat. J.J. Hastings In the weeks since the project started, a wave of information has emergedabout how long the coronavirus can last in air and on different surfaces. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention notes that while human-to-human transmission of the virus is most common,there is a small chance of picking up the virus from your environmentif you touch the same surfaces known as fomites where infected people may have left behind traces of the virus.I dont think we can rule out a fomite route of exposure, saysDr. Scott Meschke, an environmental virologist with the University of Washington. This virus is new enough that I dont think we fully understand the problem yet. And so I think there is value in trying to understand how the virus gets from one person to another. If youre finding it on a surface, then youve got more reason to investigate further.Swabbing SeattleAs Hastings colleagues around the world started sampling, they shipped her enough material for a few different time pointsworth of swabs.It was like, OK, Ill see you guys in a little bit Im heading to Seattle to go and see family, and then yeah, Hastings says. Now that its sort of indefinite, they sent some more swabs.Hastings settled on swabbing three locations within Pike Place Market and the adjacent Victor Steinbrueck Park. Security guards around Pike Place were very friendly and helpful in talking about where people were congregating nearby to help us best pick sites, Hastings says.Starting March 19, she swabbed twice a day, every other day, after work hours so she wouldnt run into as many people. To get there and back, she took nearly empty Washington state ferries from Bremerton to the city, and her mom picked her up. J.J. Hastings and Zach Mueller spent time in downtown Seattles Pike Place Market during the early weeks of the pandemic. J.J. Hastings Forhelp, Hastings recruited Seattleite Zach Mueller, whom she knows through her work with community biology labs. Swabbing the sites together took between an hour and an hour and a half. To ensure they had collected enough material, they swabbed surfaces for three minutes.Hastings was conscious of not trying to conceal what she wasdoing,carryingher credentials and an explanatory letter from Cornell just in case. She was surprised to find that the skepticism quickly gave way to enthusiasm and support from onlookers, especially unhoused people.It was actually an amazing experience to go into the city during that period where there was definitely heightened precaution and anxiety, she says. I was expecting people to be rather suspicious, as weve seen in past MetaSub sampling, but instead once people engaged and asked me what we were doing, they were very positive. It was very heartening.For safety, Mueller and Hastings socially distanced and wore gloves and extra layers they could easily remove. This was before the CDC recommended use of masks in areas of high traffic. To protect themselves and their samples, they were conscientious about what they touched. That meant frequently washing already chapped hands, using individually wrapped swabs and sterilizing gloves by rinsing them in 70 isopropyl alcohol.Part of the cost of doing business I guess in science, to ask the important questions, is you really have to be willing to accept some risk, she says. But with both of Hastings parents in high-risk groups, she had to take extra precautions. Early on, they had near-daily discussions about protocols for many activities. Weve had to have frank and open and sometimes challenging conversations about how you balance whatever risk thats involved in doing your jobwith the people around you, says Hastings. But its been really helpfulI think, for them to get to know what I do on a very personal and direct level through witnessing the questions that Ive had to ask in helping us think through how to better protect our family.We had our own sort of decontamination team that was built off of my experience working in infectious disease labs and modified it as best we could for when I would go in and out of the city, she says.Swabbing in a shutdownWhile Hastings and Mueller were able to log some sampling expeditions, things became more difficult as local government limited access to parts of Seattle, including Pike Place Market.The last time Mueller went to swab Pike Place, he discovered it was closed.Hastings tried to get in touch with market management about continuing sampling, but was unable to. Instead, they found publicly accessible ATMs, as colleagues overseas had, selecting machines along Pike Street and FirstAvenue to swab.The team completed its first phase of swabbing on April 7, Hastings says, because they had a predetermined timeline for taking initial samples. In retrospect, she thinks that was lucky: It was right before we kind of reached peak transmission in Seattle,so right when it would have been really risky to go out into the public. She and Mueller collected 94 samples totalas of May 25, theyre still waiting on their samples to be processed by colleagues in New York. J.J. Hastings and Zach Mueller swabbed ATM keypads after they lost access to Pike Place Market. J.J. Hastings Swabbing has been on pause as Hastings watches for more parts of the state to advance to Phase 2of Gov. Jay Inslees Stay Home, Stay Healthy order, in the hope that they can detect any changes to microbial flora as the city reopens.They also want to see if their initial batch of swabs turns up quality samples, which will inform whether they adjust their methods for the next phase. The MetaSub project has a long history of mostly studying environmental DNA, and is now prioritizing how to collect and analyze viral RNA, which degrades faster in the environment and is harder to identify.Shes also been reaching out to local and state government officials for support on the project, but has yet to hear back.Hastings hopes to enlist the support of local and state government officials, and she hopes to recruit more people so they can collect hundreds to thousands of samples over more sites and for a longer period of time. With only Zach and me, its a big task for just the two of us, she says. I wont be in the greater Seattle area forever Ill be heading back to New York in the next few months and I really want to do whatever capacity building I canhere for anyone that wants to get involved.Mason, the MetaSub principal investigator,says the global research is ongoing and slated to continue through the summer. He says that global sampling has turned up positive identifications of the coronavirus in the environment, although results are being all merged into one large paper on it.While she waits for her swabs to process, shes been developing protocols with a few colleagues for more coronavirus research: wastewater treatment sampling, which researchers like UWs Meschke say can be very useful in detecting viruses and outbreaks.As the pandemic drags on, Hastings finds herself leaning on skills she has learned from living and working in close quarters for extended periods of time. Part of that involves coping with and accepting the unknown.This COVID era differs quite a bit from space explorations or other missions.We dont have a defined mission, other than to try and get back to some level of normalcy, she says. But at least I can recognize when I need a little bit of self-care and recognize certain behaviors and effects that we see in crews in quarantine for a long period of time.And shes looking for silver linings, no matter how bleak or interminable the situation may be.I have spent most of my adult life overseas on my own living away from my family, she says. So its been really meaningful to be able to spend some time especially with my nieces and nephew, as theyre in a young period of their lifeand to spend time with my family in close quarters, getting to know each other during this time a bit more deeply. Topics: Coronavirus, Health, Innovation, Science, Seattle & King County, Washington State

New Northwest arts journal wants to know what’s on your walls
05/27/2020 12:00am

That same afternoon, Seattle and King County announced that a second person had died of the coronavirus at EvergreenHealth hospital in Kirkland it was the second coronavirus death in the country at the time, plus four new cases locally. Soon after, museums and galleries in Seattle started closing. And then, Kahlon got very sick. In spite of a negative test result, her doctor said to presume her illness was COVID-19.Almost immediately after launching, New Archives was forced into a hiatus.These stuck-at-homechoreographers offer curbside dance performanceduring drive-in event.Confined to her couch by a raging fever, Kahlon saw googly eyes, bright colors and squiggly spaghetti strands. These werent figments of a sweaty delirium. They were visual details of the two mixed-media collages on her wall, one by Tacoma-based artist Tyrone Patkoski, the other by Daybreak Star preschool students. Amid the throes of her illness, the images sparked an idea: Instead of soliciting writing about art on gallery walls, she would ask people to critique the art in their home.Ive been wondering, Kahlon wrote in a New Archives post in early May, what art youve been looking at. The post included an open call for submissions. Morning after morning, long solitary day after long solitary day. What piece catches your eye when you wake up, or wait for your coffee to be ready what piece in the background do folks ask about in your Zoom meetingsWe might be confined to our personal spaces under the stay-at-home order, but were still experiencing art, Kahlon told me while sitting on her porch during a recent Zoom call. She was finally starting to feel a bitbetter.Everyones talking about how much TV and music were consuming in isolation, she said. But then theres this art on our walls that were also spending so much time with in a different way than we ever anticipated. Two mixed-media collages,one by Tacoma-based artist Tyrone Patkoski at left,the other by Daybreak Star preschool students,gaveSatpreet Kahlon a new idea: during the stay-at-home order, askpeople to review the art on their own walls.Satpreet Kahlon So much about our lives now is different from what wed anticipated.Forever ago, on a brisk February afternoon, I met up with Kahlon and Offenbacher in Columbia City to talk about their new publishing venture ahead of its launch. We had no idea that we would soon measure the time in B.C. Before Coronavirus and C.E. Coronavirus Era. The interview might as well have happened in another world, one where we could still jam in around a smallish table, leaning close to hear each other over the babble and clatter bouncing around the bustling Columbia City Bakery.Seattle photographers arefinding creative ways to get close to people from a distance.An artwork or art show is one half of a conversation, Kahlon said then. Without enough outlets for arts writing, theres no call and response. Its just a call and then emptiness.Over the background noise in the cafe, Kahlon, the journals managing editor, and Offenbacher, fundraiser and publisher, described how New Archives would try to provide the response. Its basic tenets: essays, artist interviews and critiques would be infused with a highly personal perspective, and writers would be paid above industry standards $300, whether they wrote three or 10 paragraphs.In February, things were looking up. They had raised about $25,000, roughly half of the budget needed to operate throughout 2020. The funding came fromlocal philanthropists, including Seattle art collectors Janice Niemi and Dennis Braddock,and Charlie Wright, publisher of local independent poetry press Wave Books, as well as art foundation Western Bridge.Everything was ready to go. Kahlon had a large color-coded Excel sheet with detailed publishing plans all the way through August.But then: coronavirus. Teenage me saw The Girl frequently in the entryway of my partners childhood home, writes Matthew Offenbacher aboutMike Smiths acrylic-on-plexiglass painting The Girl and the 101st View of Mt. Fuji 1981.Now, I see it every day because it hangs in our living room.Matthew Offenbacher In early May, the new New Archives began accepting submissions for a revised content plan: the Art at Home series. The subject should just be an artwork defined very, very loosely you have been sharing your quarantine time with, the website prompts, one that inspires you to write something, whatever that something may be.A recent entry, by Beleszove Wildish Josivu Foldlanya, chronicles the writers love at first sight upon finding a piece of needlework depicting red and orange flowers crumpled up in the bottom of a cardboard box at a free sale.When I became homeless, I couldnt take much with me, least of all, large pieces of art, Foldlanya writes about a previous period of living without a fixed address. So this wool-threaded artwork is also a security blanket: a sign that, for now, I still have a roof over my head and a wall to hang a picture.One of the earliest Art at Home reviews is by Tom Eykemans, co-founder of the Seattle Art Book Fair the inaugural edition of which was postponed by the coronavirus. Eykemans writes about a tiny but mighty painting of a stormy sky by Abraham Murley, which he purchased at the University of Washington School of Art student sale. The rose-tinted colors of clouds at sunset hint that a dark storm is passing, he writes, and better days are ahead.For New Archives, the days ahead are still a mystery. Kahlon is ramping up the publishing schedule, with two to three posts a week, including reviews written before the pandemic, a new column answering questions about equity in the art world and a weekly installment of Art at Home.Plans for paid gallery-show reviews may have been temporarily postponed, but writers will still be paid for Art at Home pieces, on a sliding scale, according to need. Its our way of getting money into peoples hands without putting too much pressure on them, Kahlon says. We only have $20,000 and thats not a ton of money, but it feels like enough that we can get $150 into the hands of 100 people. Focusing on direct action rather than our own survival is really important to us.Offenbacher doesnt know whether hell be able to raise the rest of the years budget in the coming months, and no one knows what the future holds in terms of when museum and gallery shows will resume. In the meantime, New Archives will still function as an archive, just not quite the one Kahlon and Offenbacher originally imagined. Instead, itll serve as a new kind of archive, capturing the peculiarities of living up close with art, seeing it constantly and maybe anew all while the pandemic wreaks havoc on the art world outside our homes.Theres a real need for art writing, and to be talking about whats happening, Offenbacher says, whatever form the community takes as it rebuilds. Article continues below Related Stories Topics: Arts, Coronavirus, Features, Media, Pacific Northwest

El Siete Dias
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Abril periodico 2020
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Directorio 2020
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Clasificados
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KCTS-TV
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KIRO-TV
KIRO-TV

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KOMO-TV
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KSTW-TV / CW 11
KSTW-TV / CW 11

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The 100’s Marie Avgeropoulos On Saying Goodbye To Octavia Blake
05/28/2020 2:24pm

The 100s Marie Avgeropoulos on saying goodbye to Octavia Blake.

Inside: DC’s Legends of Tomorrow “The One Where We’re Trapped On TV”
05/28/2020 1:14pm

Get a behind the scenes look at the latest DCs Legends of Tomorrow episode Watch DCs Legends of Tomorrow on Tuesdays at 9pm on CW11 Seattle Stream new episodes of DCs Legends of Tomorrow Wednesdays free only on The CW.

In The Dark Cast Chat With Brooke Markham
05/28/2020 1:10pm

Executive Producer Corinne Kingsbury, and actors Perry Mattfeld and Brooke Markham discuss Brookes character on the show Tune in to In the Dark on Thursdays at 9pm on CW11 Seattle Stream new episodes of In The Dark Fridays free only on The CW.

The 100 – “False Gods”
05/28/2020 12:52pm

UNEXPECTED THREAT As Raven Lindsey Morgan faces an unexpected threat, Clarke Eliza Taylor must keep the peace among opposing factions in Sanctum. Bob Morley, Marie Avgeropuolos, Richard Harmon, Tasya Teles, Shannon Kook, JR Bourne, Shelby Flannery and Chuku Modu also star. Tim Scanlan directed the episode written by Kim Shumway 702. Original airdate 6/3/2020

Ruby Rose Staying Quiet On Batwoman Departure
05/28/2020 10:57am

Ruby Rose staying quiet on Batwoman departure.

KUNS-TV
KUNS-TV

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Puget Sound Business Journal
Puget Sound Business Journal

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Microsoft investment leads establishment of UW accessible tech center
05/28/2020 3:52pm

The University of Washington established an accessible technology center with a $2.5 million investment from Microsoft, the school announced in a Thursday news release. The Center for Research and Education on Accessible Technology and Experiences CREATE aims to use technology to make public spaces more accessible to those with disabilities, and to make that technology more accessible. The center will focus on researching accessibility technology design and engineering, translating that into

Redmond company powers Cessna Caravan in electric aviation milestone
05/28/2020 3:27pm

In its first flight during, the electric airplane climbed 2,500 feet and made several turns before returning to the airport in Moses Lake.

Bezos pledges to match donations for new Covid-19 relief fund
05/28/2020 3:07pm

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has agreed to match individual contributions to a new philanthropy fund aimed at helping those affected by Covid-19.Bezos said he will to contribute up to $25 million to All in WA, a statewide relief effort to support workers and families that have been severely affected by the pandemic.One in five workers across the state has filed for unemployment and faces the possibility of losing their home or going hungry because of the pandemic, All In WA said.The fund aims to help

Gov. Inslee confronts mounting pressure to reopen economy
05/28/2020 2:50pm

Washington state is growing restless, as demonstrated by a feisty exchange during the governors most recent news conference.

New tool shows how close Seattle is to further reopening the economy
05/28/2020 1:37pm

Over the last 14 days, the county has seen 28 new cases per 100,000 people. It needs to drop to 16 cases before the county can go to Phase 2 of reopening the economy.

Seattle Business Monthly
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Seattle Post-Intelligencer
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The Falcon
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The Seattle Medium
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Census Bureau To Deliver 2020 Census Questionnaires In Puget Sound​
05/27/2020 9:38am

The U.S. Census Bureau, in coordination with federal, state and local health officials, recently began dropping off 2020 Census questionnaire packets at front doors of households in the Puget Sound Area. This is done in areas where the majority of households do not receive mail at their physical address. The Census Bureau began hand-delivering census

Big Brothers Big Sisters Teams Up With Feeding Program To Provide Groceries To Local Families
05/27/2020 9:30am

BBBSPS has taken the lead on providing much needed food assistance due to food insecurities throughout the Puget Sound region, as they recently launched their Free Fresh Market program in partnership with the Emergency Feeding Program.

Community Mourns The Loss Of Long-time Activist Tony Orange
05/27/2020 8:55am

Orange was recognized by the Seattle City Council and Mayor with a resolution in celebration of his legacy and life designating August 29, 2014 as Tony Orange Day.

COVID-19 Philanthropy: 11-Year-Old Entrepreneur Donates Proceeds From Sales Back Into The Community
05/27/2020 7:55am

By Aaron Allen The Seattle Medium 11-year-old Averionna Wade may not have millions of dollars in her bank account, but she has already mastered the art of philanthropy. Wade, an aspiring fashion designer who hails from a family of seamstresses, has been producing and selling face masks during the COVID-19 Pandemic and donating her

What About Our Children?
05/25/2020 4:20pm

Historically, our communities have been reluctant to accept the existence of mental health problems ignoring rather than addressing them. If healing is our true purpose, we must first acknowledge the full scope of the issues general and individualwhich confront the target of our concern.

The Seattle Times
The Seattle Times

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Williamson seeks to avoid answering ex-agent’s questions
05/28/2020 3:55pm

MIAMI AP Attorneys for NBA rookie Zion Williamson seek to block his former marketing agents effort to have the ex-Duke star answer questions about whether he received improper benefits before playing for the Blue Devils. In a Florida court filing last week, Williamsons attorneys say those questions are nothing more than a fishing expedition

Secrecy on legislator’s COVID-19 illness roils a statehouse
05/28/2020 3:53pm

HARRISBURG, Pa. AP A bitter partisan fight over a Pennsylvania lawmakers decision to wait a week before disclosing his COVID-19 diagnosis spread to the House floor Thursday, and the state attorney general declined to investigate. A day after Republican Rep. Andrew Lewis announcement through a news release that he had self-isolated and recovered from

Redmond startup powers all-electric first flight of a Cessna turboprop
05/28/2020 3:52pm

Propelled by an electric motor designed by Redmond startup MagniX, a modified electric battery powered-Cessna Caravan turboprop flew for the first time at Moses Lake. Its a step toward development of an electric propulsion system that can be retrofitted to existing small fixed wing aircraft.

Court denies request to revive US pipeline permit program
05/28/2020 3:47pm

BILLINGS, Mont. AP A U.S. appeals court on Thursday turned down a request by the Trump administration and energy industry groups to revive a permit program for new oil and gas pipelines that had been canceled by a lower court. The case originated with a challenge to the Keystone XL oil pipeline from Canada

Officer accused in black man’s death involved in 3 shootings
05/28/2020 3:46pm

A white Minneapolis police officer accused of killing a black suspect by kneeling on his neck is a 19-year veteran of the force with a service record that includes three shooting incidents, one of them fatal, and nearly 20 complaints. Derek Chauvin became the focus of angry street protests and a federal investigation after he

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