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RVA Magazine
RVA Magazine

(804) 349-5890

Richmond, VA

Website

Richmond Free Press
Richmond Free Press

(804) 644-0496

422 E Franklin St
Richmond, VA 23219   Directions

Website

Richmond Times-Dispatch
Richmond Times-Dispatch

(804) 649-6000

300 E Franklin St
Richmond, VA 23219   Directions

Website

Style Weekly
Style Weekly

(804) 358-0825

24 E 3rd St
Richmond, VA 23224   Directions

Website

Earth Day Events
04/20/2021 12:00am

From learning about electric cars to plogging, Earth Day offers opportunities for education and cleaning up. When CBS network anchor Walter Cronkite delivered the news April 22, 1970, he devoted part of the broadcast to the very first Earth Day.A unique day in American history is ending. A day set aside for a nationwide outpouring of mankind seeking its own survival. Earth Day, a day dedicated to enlisting all the citizens of a bountiful country in a common cause of saving life from the deadly byproducts of that bounty.Fifty-one years later, Earth Day continues with plenty of local opportunities to learn and contribute to the health of Mother Earth and her future. Here are a few:For those curious about electric cars, Earth Day offers an opportunity to up your knowledge. Drive Electric Earth Day will be celebrated at Deep Run Park and Recreation Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with Teslas, Mini-Coopers, BMWs and Chevrolets on site, along with education exhibits from Plug in America and the Electric Auto Association addressing basic questions about electric vehicle technology and benefits. Masks are required and people who register to attend will be entered into a drawing for a $250 Visa gift card.April 24, 9900 Ridgefield Park-way, driveelectricearthday.org.If youve never heard of plogging, Earth Day is the right time to find out. Plogging, a combination of jogging and picking up litter, began in Sweden and has found a home in Richmond the past few years. The fourth annual Earth Day Plogging Event happens April 25, starting at 11 a.m. in the parking lot of the pedestrian bridge to Belle Isle. There, organizers will hand out masks and gloves and provide hand sanitizer before heading over to Belle Isle. The cleanup runs from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., at which point the trash will be returned to the parking lot and the afterparty moves to Vasen Brewery.April 25, keepvirginiacozy.org.Combining a charitable donation with running or walking is the fifth annual Earth Day 1M, 5K, 10K, 13.1 and 26.2, which this year will be a virtual run or walk. Part of the registration fee will be donated to Wild Earth Allies, a group working to protect wildlife and habitats throughout the world. Once registered, participants choose their own route and distance to be completed April 22 or any time during the month of April. Bibs and medals are mailed out after registration and finishing times need to be reported.April 1-30, eventbrite.com/e/earth-day-1m-5k-10k-131-262-participate-from-home-tickets-143383284263.Water is life and our local water could use some help. The Friends of Bryan Park are holding an Earth Day Water Cleanup on April 24 from 10 a.m. to noon. Boots, galoshes, mud shoes and even rain gear are suggested, depending on the forecast, while trash bags, grabbers and gloves will be provided. Registration is not required and participants should meet at Bryan Park Shelter No. 1 to begin.April 24, Last Saturdays Water Cleanups on Facebook.A new park is in the works on South Side and volunteers are needed to help clean up the property.The 13-acre parcelalong Warwick Road is in an area short on green spaces and parks and contains portions ofGrindall Creek, an important tributary to the James River. To kick things off the Capital Region Land Conservancy needs people to help pick up litter and debris from the forested portions of the property, the roadside andthe creek April 29 from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The city plans to design the park to meet the shared goals of the community withtrails, a greenway with shared-use paths and possibly a natural area for students at Thomas C. Boushall Middle School to learn about watersheds and the environment. Masks are required when social distancing isnt possible and the event is limited to 25 people, so register early to participate.April 29, capitalregionland.org/events.To learn more about the issues, theres Earth Day 2021 Live, a virtual three-day summit themed Restore Our Earth. It begins with a global youth climate summit featuring panels, speeches and discussions with todays youth climate activists including Greta Thunberg. That will be followed by a hip-hop caucuspresenting the We Shall Breathe virtual summit that examines climate and environmental justice, connecting the climate crisis to issues of pollution, poverty, police brutality and the pandemic, all within a racial-justice framework. Day two focuses on education and day three focuses on natural processes, emerging green technologies and innovative thinking to restore the worlds ecosystems. The summit will be streamed live on the Earth Day website.April 20-22, earthday.org/earth-day-2021.Back to the Environmental Issue

Keep Walking
04/20/2021 12:00am

As a panacea to the pandemic, a German hiker tackles all of Virginias state parks. By spring 2020, Dominik Kulusic, a 26-year-old German graduate student in humanresources management at Rutgers University, wascaught in the crosshairs of the pandemic. Classes were remote. The student gym closed. The Big Apple, a nearby lure, was no longer an option. And by February his housemates, fellow German nationals, had trickled away. So last April the peripatetic Kulusic left New Jersey for Virginia at the urging of friends. Richmond was his old stomping grounds: In 2016, while an undergraduate at the University of Konstanz in southern Germany studying politicalscience andpublic administration, he spent a semester at the University of Richmond.But when the strapping, 6-foot, 3-inch vegan realized that pandemic times in the Old Dominion made options as limited as those in the Garden State,he decided that to exercise, get outdoors and safe-distance connect with Richmond pals, hed start hiking. At Rutgers, hiking and cycling a 29-mile stretch of the Delaware and Raritan Canal State Park Trail that connects the cities of New Brunswick and Trenton akin to Virginias Capital Trail had been one of his favorite outdooractivities.Then after hiking five, and then 20, Virginia stateparks an idea hit Kulusic: Why not tackle all of Virginias 39 state parks, from the Atlantic to the AppalachiansOn a flight, Id seen a United Airlinesmagazine ad thatpromoted state parks in Kansas. It read: Try to visit them all. I wondered if it was manageable and made a plan that considered how much time I had in Virginia.A chink in the ambitious plan was the reality that Kulusic had neither a bike nor a car. Undeterred, and withdetermination and enthusiasm in equal parts, he persuaded,cajoled or charmed his friends or roommates to ferry him to close-by state parks like Pocahontas in ChesterfieldCounty, the states largest with 8,100 acres, or more often farther-flung parks with such intriguing names asWilderness Road, Shot Tower, Hungry Mother or a new state park, Clinch River, which completed his impressivecircuit.It wasnt only about the parks, it wasnt all about nature, Kulusic explained last week by phone from his hometown of Augsburg in the southernprovince of Bavaria, where he returned last month. He is in semi-lockdown and completing his Rutgers graduate studies. Some of Virginias parks are connected to the Civil War and there are these old coal mining towns. My father, like many Germans, didnt realize that Virginia has an amazing Atlantic coastline. They know about New York City, Florida and California, but dont think theres much else. When I moved to Virginia in 2016 for my semester at Richmond, I realized that the state was the birthplace of the United States but I have learnedit has a rich history and an amazingdiversity of landscapes. And Richmond itself is a treasure.While matriculating in Virginias capital city during that semester abroad, Kulusic was one of a handful of international students at the University of Richmond with internships in the Virginia General Assembly. He was assigned to state Sen. George Barker, a Democrat who represents parts of Fairfax and Prince William counties and Alexandria.But Kulusicisnt the first visitor from Germany to experience Virginias natural environment and governmental interactions. Johann Schopf, a German surgeon and intellectual who took a grand tour of the fledgling nation in 1783 and arrived in Richmond by stagecoach,wrote in his journal: The falls of the river were the first object of my curiosity. ... A vast number of great and small fragments of rock fill the bed of the river as far as the eye can see and through them the current with foaming uproar makes its way. Schopf also visited a state legislative session being held in the temporary capitol on Cary Street in Shockoe Slip: It sits but this is not just an expression, the German wrote, for these members show themselves in every possible position rather than that of sitting still, with dignity and attention. An assembly of men whose object is the seriousand important one of making laws, should at least observe a certain decorum, but independence prevails even here.My favorite class at the University of Richmond was an internship with Senator Barker, he says. It was through the GeneralAssembly that Kulusic met lobbyist Demas Boudreaux, who works in federal and state relations for the VirginiaHousing Authority.In the summer of 2017, when Boudreaux was out of town for several weeks, he asked Kulusic to housesit at his home in Manchester. Through visits to Boudreauxs family in western Virginia, Kulusics interest was piqued for exploring outlying parts of the state. When Kulusic returned to Richmond a year ago, Boudreaux offered him lodging and dug deep into storage to retrieve and resuscitatea bicycle. He and mutual friends either tag-teamed or piled in together to drive Kulusic to state parks.Each trip was different, depending on the park, the weather and the season, says Kulusic. New River State Park is just a trail, but a 56-mile trail each way. That was something.Other park explorations mighthave included only a brief stay. They seldom included an overnight stay in a park.Since Dominik is vegan that can be a challenge, especially in the far rural areas, says Boudreaux of the limited dining options during the excursions. Although Kulusic often filled up on oatmeal and berries before leaving Richmond, rice and bean tacos at Taco Bell restaurants were the only sure vegan option on the road. And the farther out you go, even the Taco Bells disappear.So what were Kulusics thoughts on our best outdoor offeringsThe beaches are great, the Dismal Swamp is amazingand the rolling hills arewhat makes Virginia special, he says. But the mountains are what really makes it for Virginia. They are among the oldest mountains in the world. They are very different from the Alps which are about a three-hour drive from my home in Augsburg.One of Kulusics favoritestateparks is False Cape inVirginia Beach, south of Sandbridge. It is an adventure getting there, he says. We parked and then rented bikes. We took abike path for about4 miles until it was too sandy and we started walking. It was August and it was hot. You can then walk to the North Carolina state line if you want. It is wonderful, one of the only undeveloped stretches of beach on the East Coast.On a future trip to Virginia, Kulusic will find a 40thstate park awaiting him. Machicomoco State Park is a 645-acre destination on the York River in Gloucester County that celebratesthe states native tribes. It was officiallyopened last week on April 16 with a remote dedication, of course, and spot-on for Earth Day.Meanwhile, Kulusic is introducing his familymembers to hikes near Augsburg. They aregame. My mother says that shes lived in Germany most of her life and never been to places we go.Virginias 40 State ParksBear Creek Lake Cumberland County Belle Isle Lancaster County Caledon King George County Chippokes Plantation Surry County Claytor Lake Dublin Clinch River St. Paul Douthat Millboro Fairy Stone Stuart False Cape Virginia Beach First Landing Virginia Beach Grayson Highlands Mouth of Wilson High Bridge Trail Farmville Holliday Lake Appomattox County HungryMother Marion James River Gladstone Kiptopeke Cape Charles Lake Anna Spotsylvania County Leesylvania Woodbridge Machicomoco State Park Gloucester County Mason Neck Lorton Natural Bridge Natural Bridge Natural Tunnel Duffield New River Trail Fosters Falls Occoneechee Clarksville Pocahontas ChesterfieldCounty Powhatan Powhatan County Sailors Creek Battlefield Rice Seven Bends Woodstock ShenandoahRiver Raymond R. Andy Guest Jr. Bentonsville Shot Tower Austinville Sky Meadows Delaplane SmithMountain Lake Huddleston Southwest Virginia Museum Big Stone Gap Staunton River Scottsburg Staunton River Battlefield Randolph Twin Lakes Green Bay Westmoreland Montross Widewater Stafford County Wilderness Road EwingYork River WilliamsburgBack to the Environmental Issue

A New Age
04/20/2021 12:00am

Is the dawn of electric vehicles finally here New Virginia laws are being applauded by dealers, environmentalists and utilities but theres a catch. For years, electric vehicles have been a great, unrealized dream for the environmentally minded.The vehicles, known as EVs, are more efficient and much less polluting than petroleum-powered, internal combustion cars and trucks. But they have been very expensive and impractical because of their limited range between recharging.Finally, that seems to be changing in a big way. Major automakers General Motors, Volkswagen and Volvo recently announced theyd go all-electric in a decade or so. Prices for the vehicles have been dropping for months. New networks of charging stations are being erected.President Joe Biden wants 500,000 charging stations across the country by 2030 and plans to switch vehicles owned by the federal government, such as U.S. Postal Service vans, to be electric.Virginia has stepped up preparations for more of the vehicles. On March 19, Gov. Ralph Northam signed a law that would increase the number of EVs and hybrids that dealers must sell. He directed the State Corporation Commission to review policies to boost their use.The new laws are applauded by car dealers, environmentalists and utilities such as Dominion Energy Virginia. Five years ago, you would never have seen a TV commercial for electric vehicles. But they are there now, says Steve Banashek, who heads EV promotion efforts for the Virginia chapter of the Sierra Club. He rated recent work by the General Assembly on the vehicles as phenomenal.Passed was a bill that would provide a $2,500, on-the-spot payment for anyone who buys an EV in the state. Qualifying lower income people can get an extra $2,000 payment. Buyers can also get a $7,500 federal tax credit.That may sound generous, but theres a catch. The state legislature did not set up a method of funding the rebates. You have to put your money where the mandate is, says Don Hall, president and chief executive with the Virginia Automobile Dealers Association. He says he is disappointed that the General Assembly did not find away to fund the new rebates which are a sea change for Virginia.Halls view shows just how much the politics of EVs have shifted. Several years ago, his advocacy group got into a major tussle with Tesla, the innovator owned by technology guru Elon Musk. Tesla wanted to sidestep dealers selling its cars in Virginia and Halls group took him to court. The dispute has since been resolved.Prices dropping, charging stations risingThe price of Tesla models has been a major sticking point in the spread of EVs. Models can cost as much as $140,000 although more recent Teslas are in the $40,000 range. More affordable EVs include the Hyundai Kona, the Chevrolet Bolt and the Nissan Leaf e.One recent morning, salesman Lorenzo Rose was standing watch at Parks Chevrolet on West Broad Street.Im seeing an uptick in interest, he said. Most buyers range in age from 24 to their mid-30s. He had two types of Bolts on display. One, a gray 2021 LT, looks like a crossover and sells for $43,785. Another, a 2020 gray LT costs $39,790. Rebates and credits apply.Kenya Reid, a saleswoman at Hyman Bros. Nissan, likewise says theres been more interest in the past 90 days. She sells a Leaf Plus starting at $39,615 with a 215-mile range and a regular Leaf with a 150-mile range for $34,700. The prices are before tax credits and rebates are applied. She notes that Nissan will offer the Ariya crossover model later this year.As prices drop, range is going up. So is the number of charging stations.Rose says that the Chevrolet Bolts have three levels of charging. One uses an at-home plug intended for overnight charging at the rate of 8 miles per hour. A faster model can charge at 24 miles per hour. The fastest available takes only 30 minutes to bring a car battery to 80 percent charge capacity.In Virginia, most charging stations there are said to be 600 of them are in the Washington suburbs but they are increasing in the Richmond area. Dana Markland, chief executive of the Home Building Association of Richmond, says that contractors are putting in more charging stations at multifamily projects. They are also prewiring so more can be installed later, she says.Dominion Energy Virginia, which has been busy rebranding itself as a green utility, sees good opportunities. The company has backed recent EV legislation in the General Assembly and is working on a regional basis with other electric companies to expand networks of charging stations to make longer road trips more practical.Dominion has joined five other utilities American Electric Power, Duke Energy, Entergy, the Southern Co. and the Tennessee Valley Authority in setting up hundreds of charging stations from Virginia to Texas to help motorists take longer trips.Kaye Staples, Dominion Energy Virginias manager of electrification, says the stations could charge a car in 30 minutes. Some of the stations will charge users who can download special cell phone apps to find out where the nearest charging stations are. EV owners can pre-purchase cards allowing them access to charging station electricity. Some are free. Pollution still a problemWhile the vehicles are far less polluting than gasoline- or diesel-powered cars and trucks and their fuel and maintenance costs are far less, they arent completely clean.According to the New York Times, the Chevrolet Bolt produces about 189 grams of carbon dioxide, a major cause of climate change, for every mile driven. That compares with 385 grams of carbon dioxide for a gasoline-powered Toyota Camry and estimated to produce 385 grams of carbon dioxide per mile. The number of a Ford F-150 is 636 grams of carbon dioxide.The electricity used for EVs can also come from polluting sources such as coal or natural gas. Dominion Energy Virginia still operates large coal-fired plant at Chesterfield County but is expected to retire it in about four years. The company still relies on natural gas but canceled its highly controversial Atlantic Coast Pipeline that would have taken natural gas from West Virginia through Virginia to North Carolina. Meanwhile, the utility has announced ambitious new plans for more renewable power, including a massive wind turbine farm from Virginia Beach.Dominions Staples says her company is studying how to meet the future extra demand for power that EVs are expected to cause. The evaluation may be ready next year. It is also studying how to encourage recharging at off-peak times when power is cheaper and more available.Dominion has also run into some trouble when it pushed an idea to have ratepayers pay for new fleets of electric school buses. At one point, the plan called for as many as 1,200 such buses. But the plan drew criticism at the General Assembly and was shot down.According to Gary Greenwood of the Virginia chapter of the Sierra Club, one reason for the increasing popularity of the vehicles is that Donald Trump, who tried to push it backwards, is no longer in office. Biden and his fellow Democrats are embracing them. He drives a Tesla and finds that there are more charging stations in places he didnt expect. Besides helping stem global warming, EVs have distinct positives. We only go to the gas station when we need an inspection or a tire, he says. I dont have to buy gas. The amount of money you save is huge. Back to the Environmental Issue

GUEST COMMENTARY: Thinking Green
04/20/2021 12:00am

We need to shed the old utility-centered mindset and put people and the planet at the center of energy policy. Last year our General Assembly passed a series of energy bills that put Virginia on the path to a zero-carbon future. The Virginia Clean Economy Act requires our utilities to reduce carbon emissions from power plants to zero by 2050. Other legislation last year and this year will begin reducing emissions from the transportation and building sectors. This is good news for the planet, our health and our economy, since replacing dirty fossil fuels with clean wind and solar will lessen pollution, create new jobs and save money for customers, as well as help us meet our climate goals. Yet if we merely replace our centralized fossil energy generation model with a centralized renewable energy model, as the act envisions, we will miss an opportunity to add in layers of community benefits that increase the total value of each megawatt we add to the grid. If instead we commit to centering our energy planning on people, rather than utilities, we could maximize the value of every project undertaken in the energy transition.For example, the price of solar panels has dropped so far that a utility-scale solar project will provide electricity to the grid at a cost below that of any new fossil fuel facility like a coal or gas plant. But the same amount of solar would create more jobs and make more efficient use of land resources if it were spread across rooftops, parking lots, closed landfills, abandoned mines and former industrial sites. Combined with battery storage, some of this solar say, on schools and municipal buildings could also keep power flowing for critical services when theres a widespread power outage. Job creation, land-use efficiency and emergency preparedness are significant benefits for society as a whole, made possible by the fact that solar can be scaled up or down and located almost anywhere. More distributed solar cant entirely replace large projects we need both but small-scale solar presents opportunities that we are mostly missing out on today because we havent learned to think about energy beyond electrons on the grid.Of course, smaller solar arrays lack the efficiencies of scale that come with huge solar farms, so on a cents-per-kilowatt-hour basis they cost more. They also provide far more value in benefits to society, but those benefits add nothing to a utilitys balance sheet. Absent state directives or subsidies, utilities have no reason to invest in small projects. Their business is procuring power at the lowest possible cost to themselves. State leaders must step up their involvement if we want better results for the public.Putting people at the center of our energy planning means considerations of equity and environmental justice become embedded in every decision. The question is no longer how can we get the most energy for the least cost, its how do we get the most benefit from every megawatt built Instead of ignoring the impact of energy spending on people at the bottom of the income ladder, thats where we look to find the most benefits from carbon reductions. Looking for where we can add benefits with the energy transition also means focusing on schools, especially those in the worst condition now. Energy retrofits and solar on schools will result in not just energy savings but also healthier students with better academic outcomes. Virginia is already targeting some energy programs at low-income communities, including funding for energy efficiency and home weatherization programs. The General Assembly recognized that these programs produce the most carbon reductions for the buck, and so benefit everyone. Yet they are part of our energy strategy now not because utilities wanted them, but largely despite utility opposition. Virginia trailed other states on energy efficiency for years because utilities, not people, have been at the center of our energy planning. Even the large projects that utilities prefer could do more for society. A solar project built on farmland provides construction jobs and local tax revenue, but it can also be designed to benefit the community around it and society at large. The developer can plant native grasses and wildflowers that improve the soil and sustain birds and insects, including pollinators that are endangered today by pesticide use and habitat loss. Supporting pollinators, in turn, benefits farmers and beekeepers. The solar facility owner can also arrange for local shepherds to graze their flocks onsite, replacing the use of gasoline-powered machinery for vegetation management, and in doing so supporting other local businesses.The need for people-centered energy planning goes well beyond power production, and the potential benefits likewise touch everyone. Electrifying transportation doesnt just lower carbon emissions, it delivers health benefits by reducing smog. Those benefits reach the most people most quickly when we replace diesel buses with electric, especially in urban areas that suffer from poor air quality now. Even greater benefits would flow from reshaping our communities to be walkable and bikeable, improving everyones health and quality of life while cutting emissions. Even our houses would be built differently if we put people and planet before developer profits. Healthier, more energy-efficient homes mean lower utility bills and the ability to remain comfortable during temperature extremes and power outages, but to get them we must value those benefits above developers desire to cut costs.For all the dismal news about the climate crisis, we are fortunate to live at a time when new technologies make it possible not just to decarbonize our energy supply, but to deliver healthier air, greater social justice, better homes and stronger communities. The transition from fossil fuels to clean renewables makes these gains possible, but not inevitable. We can achieve them only by shedding the old utility-centered mindset and putting people and planet at the center of our energy policy. Ivy Main is the renewable energy chair for the Virginia chapter of the Sierra Club and writes about energy on her blogpowerforthepeopleva.com.Back to the Environmental Issue

The 2021 Environmental Issue
04/20/2021 12:00am

GUEST COMMENTARY: Thinking Green We need to shed the old utility-centered mindset and put people and the planet at the center of energy policy.A New AgeIs the dawn of electric vehicles finally here New Virginia laws are being applauded by dealers, environmentalists and utilities but theres a catch.Keep WalkingAs a panacea to the pandemic, a German hiker tackles all of Virginias state parks.Earth Day Events From learning about electric cars to plogging, Earth Day offers opportunities for education and cleaning up.

WCVE-TV
WCVE-TV

(804) 320-1301

23 Sesame St
Richmond, VA 23235   Directions

Website

WRIC-TV
WRIC-TV

(804) 330-8888

301 Arboretum Pl
Richmond, VA 23236   Directions

Website

LIVE NOW: Jury to announce Derek Chauvin trial verdict at 5 p.m.
04/20/2021 3:25pm

A verdict has been reached in the trial of Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, who is charged in the death of George Floyd. The verdict will be read in open court at 5 p.m. ET.

UPDATE: Virginians having trouble filing for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance
04/20/2021 9:39am

Several Virginians say theyre having trouble filing for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance this week.

Grenova to open facility in Scott's Addition, bring 250 jobs to Richmond
04/20/2021 12:08pm

A former paint factory situated on 1900 Ellen Road in Richmonds Scotts Addition neighborhood will soon be the home of a new manufacturing facility for pipette recycling company Grenova.

Henrico firefighters host baseball clinic for Highland Springs Little League: 'We are more than just first responders'
04/20/2021 2:08pm

Henrico Firefighters are giving back to kids in the Highland Springs community with baseball. They hosted a clinic over the weekend in a new partnership to support the community they live in.

'My heart is shattered': Family mourning after 4 children, 2 women die in Chesterfield County house fire
04/19/2021 5:58pm

A devastating house fire left six people dead in Chesterfield County. In the aftermath, family members are mourning loved ones and sharing more about the victims of the tragic fire.

WRLH-TV
WRLH-TV

(804) 358-3535

1925 Westmoreland St
Richmond, VA 23230   Directions

Website

WTVR-TV
WTVR-TV

(804) 254-3600

3301 W Broad St
Richmond, VA 23230   Directions

Website

WWBT
WWBT

(804) 230-1212

5710 Midlothian Turnpike
Richmond, VA 23225   Directions

Website

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