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RVA Magazine

RVA Magazine

Richmond, VA

(804) 349-5890


Richmond Free Press

Richmond Free Press

422 E Franklin St
Richmond, VA 23219   Directions

(804) 644-0496


Richmond Times-Dispatch

Richmond Times-Dispatch

300 E Franklin St
Richmond, VA 23219   Directions

(804) 649-6000


Style Weekly

Style Weekly

24 E 3rd St
Richmond, VA 23224   Directions

(804) 358-0825


Former National Head Bill Reid Opening Music Venue in Virginia Beach - with Jewish Mother Inside
11/19/2018 11:05am

On a rainy Thursday, Bill Reid looks on a room full of beer bottles and empty chairs and sees the future of music in Hampton Roads.Hes sitting in the former Eagles Nest on 600 Nevan Road in Virginia Beachs Hilltop neighborhood a 50-year-old space that has been home to top-40 nightclubs and a dance spot called Steppin Out.But what Reid sees is the mid-sized music hall Hampton Roads has long been missing the spot that will cause bands to stop in the region instead of passing it by.By the end of the year, Reid and a group of partners will open a 600-capacity music venue called Elevation 27, so named because the venue is at one of the highest natural elevation points in Virginia Beach. It towers above sea level by 27 feet.I think this is the right room, at the right time, Reid says. In every single major market, theres a bigger room and theres a smaller room, and I think bands are going to gravitate to a smaller room.When Reid talks, people in the Virginia music scene tend to listen. Reids fingerprints have been on almost every seminal music venue in coastal Virginia for the past 30 years, including the Boathouse and Abyss and the amphitheater in Virginia Beach, the National in Richmond and The NorVa in Norfolk.Also climbing aboard at Elevation 27: The beloved breakfast and Reuben spot The Jewish Mother. The longtime home to music at multiple Virginia Beach locations, including this one, will re-open at the venue.The restaurant will serve breakfast and lunch during the day and late-night food during shows.The Jewish Mother was a 40-year tradition in Hampton Roads, but closed four years ago because of the health and financial difficulties of its chef and owner, Scotty Miller.I got very sick. I had some angioplasty and that got infected, says Miller. Well, that kept me in hospital for almost five months. I found out while Id been gone, theyd been partying.He laughs, a little regret caught in his throat. He says that when he returned, his finances and inventory were in too bad a shape to continue.In the meantime, hes been catering and recovering his health. When Reid contacted Miller about licensing The Jewish Mother name, the two ended up in business together instead.Bill doesnt want to be in the food business, Miller says. I want to be in the food business. Ive got all my good cooks coming back.The only thing hes not bringing back is the borscht, he says. Because nobody orders borscht anymore.But The Jewish Mothers fresh-cut meats and scratch-made egg and chicken salads will return. The brunch items will return. The matzo ball soup will return. And best of all, says Miller, the kitchen is just how he left it: The final location of The Jewish Mother was in the same building as Elevation 27, and none of the intervening tenants changed a thing.Its like selling a car, Reid says, and coming back three years later and finding it exactly how it was.Miller is just happy for the chance to cook his food for his customers again, he says, in his own kitchen.Ive been down in the dumps, but I feel so much better now that I know I have a home to come to every day. You watch too much Judge Judy and, hooey, I cant tell youReids other partners on the project are Judd Mendelson, Sara Mendelson, and Russell Weitzner, who had planned this year to open a music venue in Portsmouth called the Greyhound, in a former bus station.The citys planning department rejected those plans in September, after real estate developer Daniel Aston publicly opposed the venue.The Mendelsons had met Reid just before they received Portsmouths decision. Newly free after departing The NorVas management company for good in August, Reid took the Greyhound partners to view the site of the former Eagles Nest on Hilltop.It was a chance to work with one of the best concert promoters in the state, says Judd Mendelson. It was a no-brainer.Reid says the space will offer some of the best sound in the region, with a floating stage that isolates vibration using insulating layers of rubber, similar to what he placed in the National in Richmond.He says that for 20 years, hed been frustrated by the sound in The NorVa, which bounced off the brick walls of the nearly century-old former vaudeville house.The group has been installing sound baffles throughout Elevations 24-foot ceiling, and will hang curtains behind the band to further stop sound interference.You hear that says Reid, clapping his hands loudly together. In a different room, this would echo.In the long hall of the building 120 feet, the same length as The NorVa Reid envisions a room full of tables, where about 500 concert patrons will be able to sit with their drinks, or eat food from The Jewish Mother while they watch touring rock and blues bands. Outside, a heated and covered patio will seat over 100.The need for smaller venues like this one, he says, comes because there are more bands than ever, but the audience is more splintered.Bands and music are no longer driven by radio stations, Billboard magazine, Rolling Stone magazine. Everyone is hearing music on the internet, he says. So theres an explosion of new bands. There are less people going to the big shows, and more people are going to smaller shows.And bands, he says, dont want to play to a big, empty room.I remember at the amphitheater, Bob Dylan was playing. And we were looking out and weve done 5,000 people with Bob Dylan, which was really good. And then I saw the artists perspective. I saw 15,000 empty seats. And what a bummer that is.But even more so, Reid says, artists prefer intimate venues. He looks over at Miller.Panic At The Disco, which was a big band, played The Jewish Mother four or five years ago instead of playing The NorVa. We offered more money and had more tickets to sell, but they play for Scotty. Why Because theyve heard about the room.Its the same thing that helped Reid book Prince at The NorVa in 2001. Princes manager called him up and asked to play, saying the artist had heard about the space and wanted to play at the 1,500-capacity venue, even though he could book much larger venues for more money.Reid says Michael Jackson had been in town at the same time, and asked to jump up on stage as well. But Reid says Prince kiboshed the idea before the show.Apparently Prince got to thinking the night before the show that if Michael Jackson came up on stage, all the newspapers would be talking about how Michael Jackson sang at the Prince show, and he would be upstaged. Prince would be upstaged by Michael Jackson. So he told him not to come.But before he left, Reid says, Prince told him that The NorVa was his ideal venue.I just want to let you know that I love this place, Reid says Prince told him. He said this is exactly what I wanted Paisley Park to be. Thats really flattering.But now, Reid says, Elevation 27 is the venue hes excited about.He hops up onto the stage, which has been expanded since it was the stage for The Jewish Mother, and looks out across the room. Across a sea of chairs and construction, hes trying to illustrate what the band will see when they look out across the room of people.Hes envisioning the building not as it is, but as it will be, with the interior neon removed and the walls painted purple, and tables on dark wood floors. This is what the artist looks at, right This is where it all happens. Weve got, I think, good enough sightlines. I think its big enough. You know, the ceiling is tall. High. Its not in a strip mall. I mean, this is a very unique building. Its been here for 50 years.

Taste Unlimited Makes its Debut in Richmond
11/14/2018 3:20pm

It was standing room only during the lunch rush at Richmonds first Taste Unlimited. The gourmet food store and cafe, which has a devoted following in the Hampton Roads area, quietly opened its doors a couple days ago, and an announcement on Facebook this morning brought diners out in droves. The space is sleek, with about 15 two-and four-top tables in the dining area, plus a long, communal table in the middle. The retail area features giant cans of specialty nuts if samples are available, go for the Chesapeake Bay crab peanuts, plastic containers of cheese straws and bottles of gourmet maple syrup. A large cooler displays the usual suspects on the drink front: organic juices, jars of kombucha, cold-brew coffee in cans and sparkling water. For something a little different try a bottle of Tost, a fizzy white tea beverage with cranberry and ginger flavors. Next to the rows of cans and bottles are grab-and-go items like sandwiches, salads, brownies and cheese plates. Its the sandwich counter that has folks losing their minds, though. These sandwiches are beloved, and the signatures are named after Hampton Roads-area landmarks: Ghent, Princess Anne, Bayville Farms, etc. Favorites include the Northender, with honey-smoked turkey, bacon, havarti, avocado, lettuce, tomato and basil mayo on French bread. Theres also a build-your-own option, with nine breads, proteins like tuna salad, roasted chicken breast, prosciutto, citrus pork loin and garbanzo kofta, plus about a dozen cheeses. Whatever sandwich you get, ask for a side of the roasted pepper aioli. You wont regret it. On the dessert end theres a selection of gelato which will rotate seasonally, freshly-baked cookies, and double-chocolate brownies so dense you practically need to use both hands. Taste Unlimited 5706 Grove Ave., Suite 100 362-0504 taste.online/locations/richmond Every day 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.

PREVIEW: Broadway in Richmond’s “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: the Musical”
11/13/2018 12:00am

Since 1964, every year at Christmas, kids of all ages have enjoyed the televised stop-motion holiday special, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. But this year, Richmond families can head over to the Altria Theatre, where all of the characters you know and love will come to life onstage for Broadway in Richmonds Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: the Musical.Shelby Talley, who plays Rudolph, says the show has been an important part of her own familys holiday traditions, which makes this a special role. Playing Rudolph has been such a magical experience, Shelby says. I grew up watching this movie every Christmas, so it really does hold a special place in my heart, as it does for so many others.The stage musical includes all of the same songs you remember from childhood, and actors wear whimsical costumes and wield dancing puppets that look exactly like the animated characters, to bring the story to life. Watch as Sam the Snowman recounts the tale of the year a snowstorm nearly derailed Christmas, until a couple of misfits Rudolph, with his bright, shiny nose, and Hermey the Elf, who would rather become a dentist come to Santas aid. In the end, its a story about acceptance, about characters who dont know where they belong finally coming to find their place at the North Pole. Thats my favorite part of the show, when Rudolph finally feels accepted, Talley says. Its such a great lesson for kids who come to see the show and really, for all ages. Everyone is different from one another, and thats what makes someone special.Talley says she loves sharing this story and seeing how it brings families together, adding that kids especially love the show. Its a wonderful bonding experience for parents and children, family and friends to share, she says. Coming to town on the heels of Thanksgiving and playing from Nov. 23 to 25, this show is a great way to start the holiday season, and its a new and lovely way to enjoy what is, for many, a longstanding holiday tradition. SBroadway in Richmonds Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: the Musical, runs from Nov. 23 to 25 at the Altria Theatre. Tickets cost $33.50. altriatheater.com.

Busy Richmond-based artist Leigh Suggs has a solo show and two group exhibitions this fall
11/13/2018 12:00am

Artist Leigh Suggs is having a busy fall. She has a solo exhibition This or That is Here, or There currently at Reynolds Gallery, a group exhibition Paper Planes at the Longwood Center for the Visual Arts that just closed and another group show, I

The American Gaze: An exhibit at Candela features an accordion book of photos taken during last year’s total solar eclipse
11/13/2018 12:00am

Two older women in bathing suits stand along the shoreline in Virginia Beach, a colorful towel between them. Facing different directions, each peers into a cereal box one Kelloggs corn flakes, one Rice Krispies modified to allow viewing of the total solar eclipse.Homemade Eclipse Viewers by Pulitzer Prize-nominated photographer Greta Pratt is part of a new exhibition and book, One Day Projects: And Light Followed the Flight of Sound at Candela Books and Gallery. Its the gallerys second collaboration withcreatorsEliot Dudikand Jared Ragland, founders of One Day Projects. The title refers to E.M. Forsters dystopian novella,The Machine Stops,in which people become totally reliant on technology to deliver sustenance, convey information and even mediate relationships.The goal of One Day Projectsis to encourage creative dialogue by challenging artists to collaboratively produce and publish innovative projects within 24 hours.With its third collaborativeartist book, the duo was inspired by natural wonder as well as the symbolic possibilities of the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, 2017.The book, a limited edition of 150, features photographs by 52 artists and presented as a 30-foot-long, hand-bound accordion, is being exhibited alongside works by 23 of the artists.Because the project revolved around a single day and how it affected people, it marked a change from previous book projects in which theyd taken the images. We asked artists from all over the country, not all of them in the path of totality, Dudik explains. It made for a diverse range of images. One particularly tranquil image is Tom Rankins photograph of a woman seated in a rowboat with her dog, wearing solar glasses looking up at the sky. After contacting 65 photographers, the duo heard back from 55, resulting in more than 300 images that required a multistep process to winnow down. So while the photographs were all taken within a 24-hour window, per the projects intent, the editing and design of the book required several months. Part of the goal with the One Day Projects is to speak to contemporary issues, but it wasnt until the editing process that Dudik and Raglund understood the connection. We felt like the images were expressing the temperature of our country, Ragland says. We thought about how, on the day of the eclipse, everyone did the same thing: They stood together and looked up, with a sense of wonder, with a sense of togetherness, with a sense of natural beauty and with a sense of unity.Bringing that point home is Matt Eichs archival pigment print, My Daughter Observing the Eclipse, Charlottesville, Virginia, which was taken in the same park where days earlier the deadly Unite the Right rally had been held to protest the removal of the Robert E, Lee monument. Eichs young daughter, surrounded by adults in eclipse glasses, peers into a Cheerio box with the Lee monument in the background. Only a week after that divisiveness, people were coming together to look up at the sky together, Dudik says.With a nod to the subject matter, Candela founder and photographer Gordon Stettinius hung the exhibition in such a way that celestial photographs clouds, eclipse, sky are higher on the walls while terrestrial images are viewed at eye level. The book is just as clever with a gold foil sun stamped on the cloth cover. Because of its accordion design, the book is covered in a clear Mylar sleeve which is stamped with a black circle to represent the moon. As you remove the book from its sleeve, the foil stamps suggest the passage of the moon in front of the sun. A limited run of 150 sold out within days, with the exception of the few copies they held back for the Candela show.Ive come to respect these two as artists since we discovered their work, Stettinius says. This is a conceptual project because theyre performing without a net. Thats definitely our thing.One Day Projects: And light followed the flight of sound through Dec. 22 at Candela Gallery, 214 W. Broad St. candelabooks.com.

WCVE-TV

WCVE-TV

23 Sesame St
Richmond, VA 23235   Directions

(804) 320-1301


WRIC-TV

WRIC-TV

301 Arboretum Pl
Richmond, VA 23236   Directions

(804) 330-8888


WRLH-TV

WRLH-TV

1925 Westmoreland St
Richmond, VA 23230   Directions

(804) 358-3535


WTVR-TV

WTVR-TV

3301 W Broad St
Richmond, VA 23230   Directions

(804) 254-3600


This winter will bring slightly above average snow to Richmond, Zach Daniel predicts
11/19/2018 11:15pm

Heres chief meteorologist Zach Daniels winter weather outlook for the upcoming season.

‘Oh my God:’ Video captures driver swerving in and out of lanes into oncoming traffic
11/19/2018 11:04pm

Terrified gasps were the only sounds Ashley Shorts could make on her 35-minute drive from Gloucester to Matthews County last Wednesday night.

Woman charged with neglect in rape of 16-month-old Tennessee boy
11/19/2018 10:25pm

Police have arrested the mother of a 16-month-old boy who authorities say a Tennessee man raped and seriously injured earlier this month.

Virginia may be the key to finally ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment
11/19/2018 10:18pm

It was passed by Congress in 1972 but still has yet to be ratified by the states more than four decades later.

Body-cam video shows Richmond officers save suicidal man from jumping off bridge
11/19/2018 9:45pm

Two Richmond police officers save a man from jumping off the Lee bridge and body-cams caught it all on video.

WWBT

WWBT

5710 Midlothian Turnpike
Richmond, VA 23225   Directions

(804) 230-1212


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