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in Richmond, VA

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RVA Magazine
RVA Magazine

Richmond, VA

(804) 349-5890

Website

Richmond Free Press
Richmond Free Press

422 E Franklin St
Richmond, VA 23219   Directions

(804) 644-0496

Website

Richmond Times-Dispatch
Richmond Times-Dispatch

300 E Franklin St
Richmond, VA 23219   Directions

(804) 649-6000

Website

Style Weekly
Style Weekly

24 E 3rd St
Richmond, VA 23224   Directions

(804) 358-0825

Website

Violin Prodigies
02/18/2020 12:00am

The artistic director of the Menuhin International Violin Competition on what to expect in May. For two weeks in May, Richmond will become a center of the musical universe with technical virtuosos regularly on display. The Biennial Menuhin International Violin Competition, the worlds leading competition for young violinists, has been called the Olympics of the iconic classical instrument, with musicians ranging from 11 to 21 years old competing in two categories. Founded in 1983 by American-born violin giant Yehudi Menuhin, the competition is a sprawling movable feast, with 20 concerts encompassing more than just the essential classical repertoire, including performances from jazz violinist Regina Carter and the debut of an Appalachian suite by Americana-bluegrass artist Mark OConnor. The top prize includes $20,000, a two-year loan of a multimillion-dollar Stradivarius violin, and the glittering launch of a lifetime career. The Richmond event is the second time the competition has been held in the U.S. The first time was 2014 in Austin, Texas, which parallels this citys creative charm. Richmond is the kind of city Menuhin would like, says Artistic Director Gordon Back. Its kind of small, a bit unknown, but very vibrant in the arts scene. A first-rate pianist, Back was Menuhins accompanist for 20 years and took over the competition leadership in 2002. The city has been on Backs radar since he performed five years ago at the University of Richmond. For me, it is very exciting. I feel it is rising. And I think we can leave a legacy, he says. The violin is the closest thing to the human voice, Back continues, and like language, it is best mastered in youth. All of the players are young, the youngest only 11 years old. They are veterans with years of instruction and disciplined practice. If you listen to the 10- to 11-year-olds, you wont believe how well they play, he says. None of those under 15 get nervous. Thats more after puberty and adolescence, which are difficult ages for a young person. How they mature into adult players can be difficult to predict. But you can look at the list of very young winners of the competition and see how many have gone on to be leading soloists, concertmasters, or leaders of string quartets or chamber ensembles, he says. So how will it work The 44 players coming to Richmond were selected from more than 300 applicants in 51 countries. For many in this select group of 18 nationalities, this will be their first trip to the United States. The competition progresses in rounds, with the initial 22 in each group trimmed down, first to 10 semifinalists and finally, five finalists. The challenges are diverse, from composing and improvising a Mozart cadenza to playing self-chosen pieces in a chamber setting, to performing a Piazzolla nuevo tango and premiering the OConnor commission. Scattered throughout are the other concerts, including performances by the jury, the Richmond Symphony Youth Orchestra, champions of classical diversity and Menuhin artists in residence Sphinx Virtuosi. The closing gala features the winners and renowned soloist Ray Chen, winner of the competition in 2008.While the jurors will be listening for specific details of technique, timbre and micro-intonation, in-depth knowledge isnt necessary for audience delight. The artist needs to communicate. People will recognize when they hear greatness, Back says. There is an audience prize so that people in the hall or watching via stream or on TV can vote for their choice of winner. VPM will broadcast the opening and closing concerts For Back, nothing beats the immediacy of being in the hall, but the closing concert, attended by ambassadors and people from around the world, is already sold out. Who wins and loses is both significant and beside the point. The biggest hurdle is just being accepted into the competition. From there, who wins is a matter not only of execution but of taste. The jury will disagree, Back says. The players are all different and all brilliant. It is oranges and pears. The Menuhin Competition runs May 14-24. Style Weekly will have more to come as we get closer to the competition. For information, visit 2020.menuhincompetition.org.

Just Desserts
02/18/2020 12:00am

Richmond Triangle Players The Cake is a crowd-pleasing comedy at the crossroads of the personal and political. Though same-sex couple Charlie Craig and David Mullins planned to marry, they found they could neither have their cake nor eat it too.In perhaps the best named Supreme Court case of all time, the complainants in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission reported a Colorado bakery to state officials after being denied a custom wedding cake. The reason The owner of the bakery disagreed with same-sex marriage because of his religious beliefs.The court ruled against the couple in 2018 on the narrow grounds that the rights commission did not use religious neutrality in its determination, but the case brought to the fore conversations about antidiscrimination laws, freedom of speech and whether businesses can deny service on the basis of religious beliefs. Inspired by these real-life events, Richmond Triangle Players play The Cake concerns a North Carolinian baker who must weigh her principles against a request for a wedding cake for a lesbian couple.In an opening monologue about baking that also represents her worldview, Della Terri Moore tells us that the craft of making cakes is one of exactitude. If you try to substitute ingredients or fudge the portions, youre asking for trouble. Her conservative point of view is challenged when Jen Nicole Morris-Anastasi, the daughter of Dellas deceased best friend, comes back to her hometown from New York with the news that shes getting married to a woman.When Jen asks Della to make a cake for the wedding, Della says shes too busy, but the denial incites a deliciously funny exploration at the crossroads of the personal and the political.From the outset, this is Moores show. Hilarious while remaining sympathetic, Moore gives a fully fleshed-out performance as a woman trying to wrestle with competing ideologies. Shes Southern sweetness without being sticky and between her takedowns of vegan pastries and her surrealist asides where she dreams of competing on a baking show, Moore had the audience in stitches opening weekend.As the daughter she never had, Morris-Anastasi carries more of the grunt work of the show as her character tries to balance having one foot in her conservative upbringing and one in the ultraliberal world where she now resides. Her most affecting scene comes when she relates her characters early views and experiences of sex with men. As Jens fiancee Macy, Zakiyyah Jackson brings righteous indignation to her role as a lesbian whos more comfortable in her skin than Jen. Playing Dellas husband Tim, Gordon Bass is funny as well without giving too much away, Bass performance will change your view of mashed potatoes forever and eventually lets his Good Ole Boy facade give way to show his own vulnerabilities.Written by Bekah Brunstetter as a way to explore her North Carolinian fathers opposition to same-sex marriage, The Cake has more of a message than your average comedy but manages to steer clear of being preachy. The shows resolution is an unpredictable one, and Brunstetters touching on topics like what it means to be a victim of cancel culture is admirable. Led by a sterling comedic performance and Dawn A. Westbrooks occasionally raunchy direction, The Cake is a crowd-pleasing morsel of show that reflects the world we inhabit. The Cake runs through March 7 at Richmond Triangle Players, 1300 Altamont Ave. For information, visit rtriangle.org or call 346-8113.

Sticky Situations
02/18/2020 12:00am

Virginia Repertory Theatre delivers an entertinaing, high-energy take on an early Hitchcock classic. Richmond audiences are in for a treat with The 39 Steps, currently playing at Hanover Tavern. This play delivers mystery and suspense with a side of Charlie Chaplin-esque comedy, all wrapped up in a thoroughly modern, German-expressionist aesthetic. Patrick Barlows stage adaptation pulls from both Hitchcocks 1935 film of the same name and the 1915 John Buchan novel that inspired it, resulting in a show that is a reflection of its era in both content and style as well as a clever parody of Hitchcock tropes. Richard Hannay is an almost stereotypical Hitchcock leading man, a little older-looking than he says he is and as prone to falling into sticky situations as he is to falling in love with every beautiful dame who crosses his path. After meeting a mysterious woman named Annabella Schmidt in a London music hall, Hannay finds himself tangled up in a conspiracy and accused of a murder he didnt commit. In order to prove his innocence, he must unravel the conspiracy and expose a ring of spies known only as The 39 Steps. The script is rich with allusion to Hitchcocks ouvre, including references to films such as Vertigo, North by Northwest, and Rear Window. Director Nathaniel Shaw keeps things lively with energetic staging and good pacing throughout the show and the cast provides great performances. As Richard Hannay, newcomer Alec Beard strikes just the right balance between hard-boiled and comedic. Irene Kuykendall is excellent as The Woman, actually portraying many women in this production, all notably distinct. Paul S. Major and Audra Honaker bring humor and energy to each scene, portraying every other character in the story -- and there are a lot of them--as The Clowns.Dialect coach Karen Kopryanski has done excellent work here, as characters speak in many different dialects and all feel consistent and believable. Ruth Hedbergs costumes are fantastic. Theyre visually interesting, period-appropriate, and integral to this production, as they help to distinguish characters and add to the comedy. Terrie Powers scenic design lends an appropriately modernist look, reminiscent of 1930s film noir. Powers stylized paintings at either side of the stage and an industrial-looking arch frame each scene, an enjoyable minimalist approach sees actors holding up an empty frame to represent a window or bouncing on a trunk to represent a moving train. B.J. Wilkinsons lighting design deepens the film noir aesthetic, creating sharp lines and angles, throwing long shadows across the stage. True Hitchcock fans are sure to delight in this production, but its also a lot of fun for the uninitiated. This is high-energy, entertaining theater that knows its theater. It might just spark interest in one of Hitchcocks more obscure early films. Virginia Repertory Theatres The 39 Steps runs through March 29 at Hanover Tavern. Tickets cost $46. va-rep.org.

Cooking Myths
02/18/2020 12:00am

Author Kelley Fanto Deetz traces the history of American food through plantation cuisine. Southern hospitality was central to building our nation, forging political partnerships and sustaining a nation. But it also relied on enslaved butlers, maids, cooks and waiters, a roster of enslaved domestics who made sure every guest was treated well.An enslaved woman who cooked on a plantation worked painfully long hours, often beginning before dawn. Plantation elite expected three meals a day for any free person visiting or living on site, so cooks had to make both planned and on-call meals. Cooks were in the kitchens 24 hours a day, waking up before dawn to make sure the household had hot food for breakfast, before cooking lunch - the largest meal of the day- and a supper served for early evening. The prep, cleanup and the cooking on an open hearth occupied their days and nights. According to Kelley Fanto Deetz, author of Bound to the Fire: How Virginias Enslaved Cooks Helped Invent American Cuisine, having blacks in charge of food preparation changed our Southern foodways. Along with human cargo, key crops made their way across the Atlantic, including okra, watermelon, millet, yams, black-eyed peas, and rice, not to mention cooking techniques, recipes and flavor profiles. Many of the dishes we take pride in as being American, like gumbo or jambalaya, are the direct descendants of West African dishes, Deetz explains ahead of her talk at the Virginia Museum of History & Culture. By the 19th century, these African dishes were written into the recipe books of Southern plantations and became synonymous with American cuisine.Food for the slave owners table came from not just the plantation, but from around the Atlantic world where enslaved Africans were producing rum and growing coffee, pineapples, tobacco and sugar. Deetz, who is thedirector of programming, education and visitor engagement at Stratford Hall, is overseeing a series of colonial foodways programs to highlight the roles that food played in building the nation.Once she began digging into the subject, she found that the pervasive narrative was that the white mistress actually was cooking the food, perhaps getting a little help from the enslaved cook. Through archival and archaeological research, oral histories, ethnography and cultural landscape studies, she learned that enslaved cooks were highly skilled, professional and rooted in their West African culture, both religiously and culinarily. As a result, they were subversive, resisted and at times wielded power over their enslavers.One way was with poison in food. The ability to poison gave them a level of power that wasnt afforded to other enslaved laborers, because they could kill a whole family with a tureen of soup, Deetz says. The risk of punishment or execution likely kept this from being commonplace, however, it absolutely did happen. Conversely, some enslaved cooks who didnt use poison were accused and executed for what was likely unintentional food poisoning.Anyone who has ever been on a plantation tour has likely heard that the plantation kitchens were located away from the main house for two reasons: the smell and the risk of fire. But there was a deeper reason, too. Moving the kitchens outside was a way to physically designate a difference between laborers and the elite, she explains. This happened towards the end of the 17th century, when race began to be a strong marker of social class.Some of the enslaved cooks were allowed to eat the food that they cooked for the white family and some were allowed to go off site to shop. But they were always under the watchful eyes of the plantation family, Deetz says. They were never truly off and had to live and work within the white household, which brought a continual level of stress.Ultimately, Deetzs goal with the book and her programming at Stratford Hall is to debunk the myths around the enslaved cooks whose images were used as propaganda during the 19th and 20th centuries think Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben to sell the ideal of happy, loyal slaves. It was a myth that made its way into grocery ads and into the minds of Americans.Their skills were incredible, their recipes were outstanding and their contributions are significant, Deetz says. When you know their history, you know the history of America. African cultures are part of this countrys DNA.The Banner Lecture with Kelley Fanto Deetz, author of Bound to the Fire: How Virginias Enslaved Cooks Helped Invent American Cuisine, will be held Thursday, Feb. 27, 6 p.m. at the Virginia Museum of History & Culture.

Pour One for Peter
02/18/2020 12:00am

Peter Hemings, Thomas Jeffersons enslaved brewmaster, is finally getting some overdue recognition. The American dream is a narrative built on biographies of people with grit who find success without the aid of means. Instead theyre armed with smarts, perseverance and luck, so the stories go. But usually omitted is the acknowledgement of barriers to success shared by the disenfranchised, whose accomplishments are often absent from the historical record. One such individual mostly omitted from history is Peter Hemings, a slave who served as Thomas Jeffersons head brewer, his tailor and chef. Its possible that Hemings is Americas first black craft brewer, says Lee Graves, a local beer historian, author and former Richmond Times-Dispatch reporter. Hemings was an elder sibling of Sally Hemings, an enslaved woman impregnated by Jefferson, a fact once vehemently denied by many. But as a man regarded as property, Hemings is mostly known to us through Jeffersons correspondence and the former presidents meticulous note taking about the goings-on at Monticello.His story is not unusual: The enslaved are often understood through the context of passing references from those in power, or as assets recorded in farm ledgers. This obscures black contributions to the making of America, says Gayle Jessup White, community engagement officer at Monticello, Jeffersons main plantation near Charlottesville. The Henrico County resident is the three-times great granddaughter of Peter Hemings and a descendant of Jefferson through another ancestor. Today she works with historians to bring the story of Hemings and other enslaved men and women down from Jeffersons little mountain.Theres a story there for all of us, White says. Theres a story for the African American community, that our ancestors lives and functions on that mountain and they were very valuable lives that we contributed to the country that America is. America is built on the backbone of enslaved people.During Black History Month, getting to know Peter Hemings is a good start for recounting an accurate, inclusive history of American brewing, and a step toward acknowledging minority contributions to establishing American industries. As the still overwhelmingly white business of craft brewing continues to grow, brewers in Virginia are poised to consider ways to increase the number of industry workers and beer drinkers of color. The increasing diversity of the U.S. demands historians strive to uncover marginalized voices. And whats a better moment to strengthen bonds and share stories than over beerUnfortunately, history largely parts ways with Hemings following Jeffersons death. But Virginia craft brewers are still uncovering and celebrating his story today.Jefferson once described Hemings as a servant of great intelligence and diligence, which he noted were necessary to master the science of brewing, in an 1821 letter to James Barbour, a U.S. statesman and namesake of Barboursville He was answering a request by Barbour for the recipe to reproduce an ale enjoyed during a visit to Monticello. The year prior, Jefferson wrote to James Madison inviting him to send a slave to receive instruction from Hemings, who is uncommonly intelligent and capable of giving instruction if your pupil is as ready at comprehending it.One wonders how far Hemings intelligence and diligence would have taken him in todays craft brewing industry, where skill and creativity is important due to ever-shifting palates. But Hemings contributions and those of other slaves to American brewing traditions are obscured by the tall tales of the founding fathers brewing their own beer, an arduous task most certainly undertaken by slaves, writes J. Nikol Jackson-Beckham, a professor of communications at Randolph College in Lynchburg, who studies beer in American culture. Thats about as easy to imagine as ... George Washington bent over to sow tobacco seeds in the fields at Mount Vernon, she writes in her article Missing Ingredients the Incomplete Story of Thomas Jeffersons Unsung Brewer.Hemings learned malting and brewing from Capt. Joseph Miller, a British brewmaster who left England during the War of 1812 to conduct business related to his family estate in America. After befriending Jefferson and an extended stay at Monticello, Miller agreed to teach Hemings, who served as Jeffersons chef. Prior to Millers arrival, Jeffersons wife, Martha Skelton Jefferson, maintained small homebrewing operations at Monticello earlier in their marriage and prior to her death in 1782. Millers tutelage of Hemings, who took over the supervision of malting and brewing, greatly increased production at Monticello and introduced ale, a stronger beer with a longer shelf life.Ale was the preferred table liquor at the multicourse dinners that reflected Jeffersons love of haute cuisine. Monticellos high-ceilinged dining room, painted chrome yellow in the fashion of the Federalist era, was the nucleus of hospitality for friends, family or visiting dignitaries. Back home from his diplomatic visits to France, prior to his presidency from 1801 to 1809, Jefferson fostered conversation with guests gathered at small tables, en lieu of place settings at a long, rectangular table that isolated chatter. Unseen slaves employed dumbwaiters that opened on either side of the fireplace to bring wine up from the cellar and placed food on the shelves of a rotating door in an adjoining hallway before service. But more than relaxing moods and complimenting dishes, beer served the practical purpose of satisfying thirst due to the lack of clean drinking water, making Hemings role doubly important. Hemings brewed 100 gallons of ale every spring and fall, then regarded as the best seasons for malting and brewing. To accommodate higher volume, a brewhouse was operating at Monticello by fall 1814, the location of which is currently unknown. Hemings also had begun malting Jeffersons grain, so he no longer had to purchase malt from his neighbors. Prior to brewing, Hemings served as head chef, having learned French cookery from his older brother, James Hemings, who previously held the role. Jefferson had arranged for the elder Hemings who should be lauded for his unsung contributions to American cuisine, according to food historians to be trained in France. Jefferson freed James Hemings in exchange for his preparing a replacement who could cook to the presidential foodies satisfaction. His love of Hemings food can be seen in a letter sent by Jefferson to Monticello from the presidents house: Direct us here how to make muffins in Peters method. My cook here cannot succeed at all in them and they are a great luxury to me.Hemings worked as a tailor in Charlottesville following Jeffersons death in 1826. The following year, he was placed on an auction block alongside 130 fellow slaves when Jeffersons estate was liquidated to pay off massive debts. A period newspaper advertisement stated that the auction which heinously ripped families apart may have placed for sale the most valuable slaves for their number ever offered at one time in the State of Virginia.Due to his talents as a chef, brewmaster and tailor, Hemings was appraised at $100 despite his 57 years. A man who may have been his nephew, Daniel Farley, was able to purchase him for a dollar. Some historians note the price may have indicated that bidders honored his familys desire to purchase his freedom. Gayle Jessup White agrees with this interpretation of her ancestors story, describing it as a gentlemans agreement among white, potential purchasers who would not bid on him. Working in the kitchen together, one brother to be free and the other to remain a slave until he was sold on the West Lawn to another relative when I think of the dignity of that man, I think of my own father, who was an extraordinarily dignified man, White says.Its very moving to me.Given the power dynamics of the time, one wonders how much creative agency Hemings had as brewmaster. Its likely that he had a degree of independence but was bound by Jeffersons taste and what ingredients could be found at Monticello and beyond at any given time, says Niya Bates, a historian at Monticello. Hemings would also have used recipes given to him by his teacher, Capt. Miller, she adds.There is a bit of creativity on Peters part when working with the materials they have on hand and working with various recipes, she explains. But I dont think theres an exact science to it either. I wouldnt say that from year-to-year, the recipe was the exact same thing, in the way that beer is produced today.An analysis of Jeffersons personality could suggest some micromanagement, says beer historian Lee Graves.Jefferson was well-known for being a stickler for just about everything. He was very curious, very demanding and he likes stuff to be to his specifications, Graves says. But I would also think that Peter had a little bit of flexibility in that, too.Sadly, no written recipes exist from Jefferson or Hemings. Its likely Hemings was literate, as was his brother, but we do know Jefferson did not tolerate insipid beer, Graves writes in his article Time to Raise a Toast to Brewer Peter Hemings.Jefferson preferred a ratio of a bushel of malt to every 8 to 10 gallons of strong beer, such as will keep for years. The beer lover also noted that the public brewery practice of producing 15 gallons for every bushel of malt makes their liquor meager and often vapid.Spruce and molasses were prime flavoring ingredients, according to the style of the time and their availability at Monticello, historians say. For malt, Jefferson directed the use of wheat and then corn, instead of barley, due to plant diseases and the grains poor adaptation to Virginias climate. The substitution would have given Monticello ales a lighter color and flavor than ales prevalent at the time, Graves says. Jefferson obtained his hops from various sources, including purchases from his own slaves. At Monticello and across the South, slaves sold garden produce, poultry and other items to their masters and used the money to purchase goods from local merchants. Slaves cultivated their own crops on Sundays or during the evening guided by, as oral tradition states, flame fed by animal fat in cast iron pots and pans. One such enterprising slave named Bagwell sold Jefferson 60 pounds of hops for $20, the equivalent of roughly $800 in todays economy. Graves speculates the slaves may have augmented their hop harvests with wild hops that were native to Virginia. One thing is certain: These early craft brewers demonstrated impressive economic self-determination, despite the confines of the plantation system. Champion Brewing Co. honored Hemings last year with the aptly named Diligence and Intelligence bittered ale, an allusion to Jeffersons letter praise of the black brewer. Danny Fain, who creates historically inspired beers for Ardent Craft Ales, debuted a Hemings-inspired spruce pale ale in collaboration with the Virginia Historical Society in 2017.But appreciation of Hemings in the world of craft brewing surely would not have happened in the absence of a greater emphasis on slaverys role as the economic engine of Monticello and other Southern estates. Before the mid-1980s, slavery wasnt mentioned during tours of Monticello. Archaeological work in the 1960s was an initial step toward recognizing black life at the plantation, and historians have gradually increased public acknowledgment of the dignity and roles of enslaved individuals. An excavated beer cellar, staged with corks, clay bottles and artifacts, gives visitors a look at the life of Hemings, as does a small living quarters near the kitchen where he cooked. Emphasis on Monticellos black history really took off 26 years ago due to the Getting Word Oral History Project, which featured archived interviews of 170 descendants of Jeffersons slaves. Most recently, the critically acclaimed traveling exhibition Slavery at Jeffersons Monticello: Paradox of Liberty focuses solely on humanizing the 607 people known to have been enslaved at Monticello, who have been largely left out of history. The exhibition debuted in 2012 at the National Museum of American History, in collaboration with the National Museum of African American History and Culture and the Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello, and is now on display in Richmond at the Black History Museum & Cultural Center of Virginia until April 18.White says she will continue the work of remembering her three-times-removed grandfather and other formerly enslaved Americans. Its my job to share those stories and to get people as excited about the families that were slaves as I am, she says. To get them as excited about their contributions.

WCVE-TV
WCVE-TV

23 Sesame St
Richmond, VA 23235   Directions

(804) 320-1301

Website

WRIC-TV
WRIC-TV

301 Arboretum Pl
Richmond, VA 23236   Directions

(804) 330-8888

Website

4 people displaced after overnight Petersburg house fire
02/22/2020 7:48am

Firefighters responded to a house fire on Forrest Lane at about 3 a.m.

Your vote could help Clover Hill be named ‘America’s Most Spirited High School’
02/22/2020 1:57pm

Out of 700 entries across the nation, Clover Hill is one of six finalists in the competition hosted by Varsity Spirit.

Bernie Sanders coming to Richmond ahead of Super Tuesday
02/21/2020 9:39pm

Sen. Bernie Sanders will return to Virginia days ahead of the March 3 primaries, holding rallies in Richmond and Northern Virginia.

Firefighter arrested in child sex sting in Chesterfield used ‘Kik’ App
02/21/2020 6:19pm

A Pittsburgh firefighter arrested at a Chesterfield Chilis following a child sex sting used a messaging app popular with tweens and teens.

WRLH-TV
WRLH-TV

1925 Westmoreland St
Richmond, VA 23230   Directions

(804) 358-3535

Website

WTVR-TV
WTVR-TV

3301 W Broad St
Richmond, VA 23230   Directions

(804) 254-3600

Website

WWBT
WWBT

5710 Midlothian Turnpike
Richmond, VA 23225   Directions

(804) 230-1212

Website

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