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RVA Magazine
RVA Magazine

(804) 349-5890

Richmond, VA

Website

Richmond Free Press
Richmond Free Press

(804) 644-0496

422 E Franklin St
Richmond, VA 23219   Directions

Website

Richmond Times-Dispatch
Richmond Times-Dispatch

(804) 649-6000

300 E Franklin St
Richmond, VA 23219   Directions

Website

Style Weekly
Style Weekly

(804) 358-0825

24 E 3rd St
Richmond, VA 23224   Directions

Website

Week of July 28
07/28/2021 3:00am

ARIES March 21-April 19 What does it mean to feel real Some people have a hard time doing that. They have such false ideas about who they are that they rarely feel real. Others are so distracted by trivial longings that they never have the luxury of settling into the exquisite at-home-ness of feeling real. For those fortunate enough to regularly experience this treasured blessing, feeling real isnt a vague concept. Its a vivid sensation of being conscious in ones body. When we feel real, we respond spontaneously, enjoy playing, and exult in the privilege of being alive. After studying your astrological potentials, Aries, I suspect that you now have an enhanced capacity to feel real.TAURUS April 20-May 20When she was a child, author Valerie Andrews visited her secret sanctuary at sunset every day for seven years. She lay on the ground among birch trees and aromatic privet plants, feeling the steady rhythmic heartbeat of the earth as she basked in the fading light. Id love for you to enjoy the revitalizing power of such a shrine. The decisions you have to make will become clear as you commune with what Andrews calls a rootlike umbilicus to the dark core of the land. Do you know of such a place If not, I suggest you find or create one.GEMINI May 21-June 20I suspect that your immediate future will be a patchwork of evocative fragments. You may be both annoyed and entertained by a series of flashing attractions, or an array of pretty baubles, or a hubbub of tasks that all seem at least mildly worth doing. Chances are good that they will ultimately knit together into a crazy-quilt unity they will weave into a pattern that makes unexpected sense. In the spirit of the spicy variety, I offer three quotes that may not seem useful to you yet, but will soon. 1. Isnt it possible that to desire a thing, to truly desire it, is a form of having it Galway Kinnell 2. It is not half so important to know as to feel. Rachel Carson 3. Like all explorers, we are drawn to discover whats out there without knowing yet if we have the courage to face it. Pema ChdrnCANCER June 21-July 22 A Tumblr blogger named Cece writes, The fact that you can soak bread in sugar, eggs, cinnamon, and vanilla, then butter a pan and fry said bread to make a meal is really liberating. I agree. And I share this with you in the hope of encouraging you to indulge in other commonplace actions that will make you feel spacious and uninhibited. Youre in a phase of your astrological cycle when youll thrive on doing day-to-day details that excite your lust for life. Enjoying the little things to the utmost will be an excellent strategy for success.LEO July 23-Aug. 22Leo poet Rene Ashley articulates a perspective I recommend you adopt. She writes, Im drawn to what flutters nebulously at the edges, at the corner of my eyejust outside my certain sight. I want to share in what I am routinely denied, or only suspect exists. I long for a glimpse of what is beginning to occur. With her thoughts as inspiration, I advise you to be hungry for what you dont know and havent perceived. Expand your curiosity so that it becomes wildly insatiable in its quest to uncover budding questions and raw truths at the peripheries of your awareness.VIRGO Aug. 23-Sept. 22There are many things in your heart you can never tell to another person, declared Virgo actor Greta Garbo 19051990. It is not right that you should tell them, she concluded. You cheapen yourself, the inside of yourself, when you tell them. I presume Greta was being melodramatic. My attitude is the opposite of hers. If you find allies who listen well and who respect your vulnerability, you should relish telling them the secrets of your heart. To do so enriches you, deepens you, and adds soulful new meanings to your primary mysteries. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to seek this wise pleasure in abundance.LIBRA Sept. 23-Oct. 22Now is a fantastic time to seek out effervescent socializing and convivial gatherings and festive celebrations. If you surround yourself with lively people, youll absorb the exact influences you need. May I suggest you host a fun event If you do, you could send out invitations that include the following allures: At my get-together, the featured flavors will be strawberry chocolate and impossibly delicious. Therell be magic vibrations and mysterious mood-enhancers. Liberating conversations will be strongly encouraged. Unpredictable revelations will be honored. If possible, please unload your fears and anxieties in a random parking lot before arriving.SCORPIO Oct. 23-Nov. 21Scorpio author Andrew Sean Greer writes, As the Japanese will tell you, one can train a rose to grow through anything, to grow through a nautilus even, but it must be done with tenderness. I think thats a vivid metaphor for one of your chief tasks in the coming weeks, Scorpio: how to carefully nurture delicate, beautiful things as you coax them to ripen in ways that will bring out their sturdiness and resilience. I believe you now have an extra capacity for wielding love to help things bloom.SAGITTARIUS Nov. 22-Dec. 21Suggested experiments to try soon: 1. Remember a past moment when you were touched with the sudden realization that you and a person youd recently met were destined to fall in love. 2. Remember a past moment when you kissed someone for the first time. 3. Remember a past moment when someone told you they loved you for the first time or when you told someone you loved them for the first time. 4. Allow the feelings from the first three experiments to permeate your life for five days. See through the eyes of the person you were during those previous breakthroughs. Treat the whole world as expansively and expectantly as you did during those times.CAPRICORN Dec. 22-Jan. 19Capricorn poet Kenneth Rexroth was shirtless as he strolled along a rural road. To his delightful amazement, a fritillary butterfly landed on his shoulder, fluttered away, landed again, fluttered awayperformed this dance numerous times. Nothing like this had ever happened to him. Later he wrote, I feel my flesh / Has suddenly become sweet / With a metamorphosis / Kept secret even from myself. In the coming days, Im expecting at least one comparable experience for you. Heres your homework: What sweet metamorphoses may be underway within youperhaps not yet having reached your conscious awarenessAQUARIUS Jan. 20-Feb. 18Each time we dont say what we want to say, were dying. Aquarian artist and singer Yoko Ono said that. I will add a further nuance: Each time were not aware of the feeling or experience or situation we want, were dying. And these will be key themes now that youve entered the I KNOW WHAT I WANT AND I KNOW HOW TO ASK FOR IT phase of your cycle. The most healing and vivifying thing you can do during the next six weeks is to be precise about your desires.PISCES Feb. 19-March 20 In 1829, Piscean author Victor Hugo began work on his novel, The Hunchback of Notre Dame. He had other projects, though, and by September 1830, he had made scant progress on Hunchback. Growing impatient, his publisher demanded that he finish the manuscript by February 1831. In response, Hugo virtually barricaded himself in his room to compel himself to meet the deadline. He even locked his clothes in a closet to prevent himself from going out. For the next five months, he wore only a gray shawl as he toiled nonstop. His stratagem worked I recommend you consider trying a somewhat less rigorous trick to enforce your self-discipline in the coming weeks. Theres no need to barricade yourself in your fortress. But I hope you will have fun taking stringent measures.

Parks and Rec
07/27/2021 12:00am

New Valentine exhibition explores the evolution of Richmonds green spaces and breathing places. A nasal spray bottle from 1994 may be among the smallest objects in the Valentines compelling new exhibit, Breathing Places: Parks and Recreation in Richmond. But the story it tells is relatable to almost anyone who has ever lived through spring here.This year, the Asthma and Allergy Foundation rated Richmond the worst city in the entire country for spring seasonal allergies. Despite parts of the city Jackson Ward, Randolph, downtown lacking a tree canopy, a large percentage of the trees planted in the early to mid-20th century were pollen-producing oaks. To add insult to injury, many 20th-century urban planners were guilty of botanical sexism by planting fast-growing male trees that didnt litter sidewalks and streets with messy fruit. But they ignored the fact that male trees shed additional pollen, thus contributing to the exacerbation of respiratory symptoms for Richmonders of all ages. Breathing is central to the story here.The new exhibition provides a deep dive into the design, use and evolution of the citys myriad parks, recreation areas and natural spaces. Over the past 170 years, access to these green spaces has been denied to some while welcoming others. Opening with a penny-farthing bicycle and a vintage baby carriage, both of which were once used in the citys parks, the exhibition allows the enlarged image behind the objects to tell the real story: An 1890 photograph depicts the governors mansion, in front of which white men ride penny farthings and Black women push carriages holding white babies. Capitol Square, the citys first public park, was enclosed by a fence that intended to keep out both animals and Black Richmonders. There was a law on the books before the Civil War that stated that Blacks were not allowed in that space unless accompanied by a white child or doing manual labor, explains Christina Vida, the Valentines Elise H. Wright curator of general collections. Although the law came off the books after the war, social practices ensured that whites continued to use the space while Blacks stayed out.Public spaces were intended to be restorative or, in the 19th century vernacular, salubrious. The name of the Valentine exhibition is drawn from an 1851 recommendation by Richmonds Committee on Public Squares which counseled the city to secure breathing places in the midst of the city or convenient to it for its residents. The problem was that the recommendation affected Black and white residents in different ways. Covenants restricted home ownership to whites and the construction of Interstate 95 reduced the size of predominately Black neighborhoods such as Jackson Ward and Randolph and mixed neighborhoods like Oregon Hill and Bryant Park. Park access for Blacks was limited or nonexistent.In the 1930s and 1940s, workers for President Franklin D. Roosevelts Works Progress Administration constructed new segregated playgrounds in Richmond, completing 13 in white neighborhoods and 11 in Black neighborhoods. After the citys white population fled to the suburbs, Richmond officially integrated all public parks and facilities, but not until 1968.It was around the same time, the late 1960s, that the city began investing in community pools in an effort to discourage children from playing in the James River. Because of the Civil Rights Act of 1965, the pools couldnt be specifically segregated, Vida says, but because of their locations they were still segregated.During the same decade, several groups including some local Cub Scout leaders began investing time and effort on the river as part of a movement to establish what became the James River Park System and provide equal access for all.Over the years, the citys parks have seen a diversification of uses as they became more than just breathing places, holding events such as concerts, protests, art shows and memorials, including one for the victims of the Virginia Tech shooting in 2007. Monroe Park was once used as the state fairgrounds and for the past decade has been the starting point for All the Saints Theater Companys annual Halloween parade. Because our parks and green spaces continue to evolve, the exhibit includes a monitor featuring a slide show of rotating images submitted by the public. Anyone can submit a photograph depicting themselves, friends or family enjoying one of Richmonds green spaces. So far at least, none have included a 2021 bottle of nasal spray.Breathing Places: Parks and Recreation in Richmond at the Valentine museum, 1015 E. Clay St. through January. thevalentine.org.

Off the Beaten Path
07/27/2021 12:00am

A runner and lifelong lover of the James River captures evocative images of the park system in photo book. Its not tough to spot Bill Draper when hes out running. Hes that rare runner who almost always has a camera around his neck, his phone in his running belt and sometimes, a telephoto lens and collapsible monopod with him.Thats because Draper is doing more than just getting a workout, sweating and burning calories. His runs hes completed 50 marathons, many in Richmond are a means of capturing the beauty and ever-changing face of the James River Park System. Despite having studied photography at Western Kentucky University, photography jobs were scarce, so he went into health care sales and marketing, a career from which he retired in 2016.Turns out retirement only left more time for running and taking photographs. Eventually he had so many striking images of the river and environs that when people began suggesting he do a book, he took note. The result is A Photographic Journey Through the James River Park System,a collection of Drapers evocative images. Because the initial printing sold out even before the books were delivered in December, Brandylane Publishers decided to do a second printing this summer.Although photography andrunning have been Drapers primary hobbies for more than 50 years, it was only when he tried trail running in 2017 that the two passions became intertwined. Invited by friends from Sportsbackers Marathon Training Team to run the trails along the north and south banks of the park, he found himself exploring trails that provided views hed never known existed in Richmond, much less in downtown Richmond.Myrunning group ran the trails spring, summer, fall andwinter, and we even went out one snowy night with headlamps, he recalls. Seeing the park through different seasons and at different times of day from morning till night inspired me to bring my camera along for my runs. Seeing a striking view of the city, a colorful sunset or a glimpse of the parks wildlife meant that his camera came out. When he began posting the photos on his Facebook page, friends as well as some of the local media and television stations took notice.Draper enjoyed the challenge of trying to capture the parksbeauty throughout the seasons, particularly availing himself of the spectacular light at sunrise and sunset. I found it rewarding to explore and find new vantage points that were off the beaten path, he explains. But I was also inspired to capture the better-known places like the Potterfield Bridge and Belle Isle, which are easy to access for everyone in the community, even in a wheelchair. His photographs also reveal the abundance of natural life along the river, depicting coyote, deer and wild turkeys, along with osprey, blue herons and bald eagles. Draper is thrilled to see the uptick in wildlife because many of the species absent in his youth have now returned to the James. I never saw a bald eagle when I was growing up, he says. Because he was raised near Riverside Drive in Stratford Hills, Draper has had a lifelong relationship with the river and its environs, swimming, canoeing and fishing in the river. But he remembers that communityaccesstothe James River was limited then.There have been so many wonderful improvements over the years, but I believe we can continue toimprove the park and create awareness that this gem exists in the middle of downtown Richmond, he says. Much of this is already in process with the 10-year master plan put in place by the city and supported by Friends of the James River Park. Having gotten so much fulfillment from runningandphotographing the park, it felt only natural for Draper to donate the proceeds of his book to the Friends of the James River Park. The firstprinting of a thousand books sold out in December and the second printing is now available online at the groups website and through multiple retailers around Richmond such as REI, theQuirk Hotel gift shop, Tweed,Lucky Road Run Shop, the Outpost in Westover Hills, the Jefferson Hotel gift shop and theVirginia Museum of Fine Arts gift shop.For Draper, its the vastness of such a unique place within the Richmond city limits that sets us apart from other cities.The James River is such a significant part of Richmondshistory and its also a playground for Richmonders and tourists, he says. On any given day, you can see people hiking, running, biking, fishing, kayaking,paddle boarding, canoeing, white water rafting, rock climbing, birding, listening to music, painting artwork, relaxing or reading a book. The list is limitless Draper is living proof that an early introduction to the James River can spark a lifelong appreciation for it. I just grew up with the James River, he says. The book morphed into something unexpected. I had no idea this would take off like it did. A Photographic Journey Through the James River Park System is available atjamesriverpark.org and various retailers.

Conversation Starter
07/27/2021 12:00am

JewFro looks to meld the diaspora of Jewish and African cuisine at its first restaurant in Shockoe Bottom this fall. The name is just offensive enough, says JewFro co-owner Trey Owens. With cancel culture running rampant, people are so quick to try and cancel you. I thought Lets use that instead as a hook to introduce people to an idea.The idea of JewFro, born during the protests that followed the murder of George Floyd last spring, is to honor our connections and similarities instead of stark differences, says Owens business partner Ari Augenbaum. Owens, Augenbaum and third partner, Nar Hovnanian, own and operate Soul Taco together. Augenbaum is Jewish and Owens says he is of the African diaspora, though he can only trace his lineage as far back as the slave ships. This is the perfect opening to explore everything. I could be from anywhere, I feel like this is the best way to honor the history of my ancestors while introducing it to other people, Owens says. JewFro started as a pop-up at Belle this January after Soul Tacos popular holiday Jingle Belle pop-up ran its festive course. Owens thought JewFros Jewish and African menu and accompanying flower-child 70s theme would only be in place for a couple of events. Instead, the pop-up ran through the end of March. As people started trying the food and responding, I thought Weve got to run with this full time, we cant just drop this one, says Augenbaum. Like everyone else in business will tell you, theres a gut feeling but there are also numbers, and as soon as we started seeing the numbers, they speak for themselves. JewFros flagship location at 1721 E. Franklin St. is set to open late summer, early fall in Shockoe Bottom says Owens. The 19th-century, two-story building features high ceilings, exposed beams, an epic curved staircase, a full kitchen and a prep kitchen. The upstairs will serve as the dining room for lunch and dinner service and the downstairs will include a full bar and waiting area, a few tables for dining, plus some to-be-announced elements. Theres also an adjacent space, accessible through a separate outside door that Owens says may be used as a deli to sell in-house meats, or as a blank slate for future pop-ups. The entire restaurant will feature modern, 70s-inspired decor, Augenbaum says.From the upstairs window, Owens points out Shockoes storied streets, theres so much history here the slaves originally laid those cobblestones. When the partners were looking for a permanent space for JewFro they were especially called to Shockoe Bottom, which once served as the center of Richmonds slave trade. We saw the space and it made all the sense in the world, Owens says. Hovnanian says initially, she wasnt as on board with fully investing in the concept as her two business partners: Aside from the fact that Im not Jewish or African, I wanted to make sure our mission wasnt getting misconstrued. Once Owens and Augenbaum started introducing her to the dishes that seamlessly melded modern and traditional African and Jewish cuisine like West African peanut soup filled with Moroccan lamb stuffed kreplach Hovnanian warmed to the idea. Im Middle Eastern, so the foods I grew up with eating, the dishes kind of struck a chord with me, Hovnanian says. She also realized that most diners understood the name was tongue-in-cheek they were willing to give the dining experience a chance before totally writing it off. While JewFros controversial name and all-inclusive mission of education and connection may get customers in the door, its the food that will keep them coming back. Everything is made from scratch, the bread, the mayo, the sauces, Augenbaum says. The brisket takes 10 days to brine and two days to cook, the preserved lemons used for aioli take 30 days to cure. It was important to us when we did the pop-up that the menu wasnt slapdash, thrown together. These dishes took weeks to prepare.Augenbaum, who cooked under Cte dIvoire Iron Chef alum Morou Ouattara in Washington, says he is excited to introduce diners to nuanced African cuisine that doesnt fall into a tired trope. African food a lot of people have no idea what that means, outside of maybe Ethiopian food, Augenbaum says. Were going to be making our best attempt to represent the continent as much as possible.To adequately represent the diverse world of Jewish cuisine as well as the dishes hailing from 54 African countries means bringing in Jewish and African chefs, to do their own thing, Owens says. Im all about sharing my platform.Augenbaum says when they started doing JewFro research and development, he stumbled upon even more similarities between the two cuisines than he initially realized. Theres such a rich history with the Middle East and the northern tip of Africa, theyre working with the same cooking techniques and ingredients, he adds.Hell play around with modern Jewish dishes think Technicolor challah and an early 2000s New York deli roll as well as more traditional cuisine. The Israeli side especially is most similar to Moroccan food, Egyptian food, they all have a different word for the same thing, like pita and laffa, Augenbaum says. We wont be pigeonholed into a Jewish deli. Jews have been scattered around the world, there are elements of pretty much any kind of cuisine that we can bring into the menu.Always on the lookout for new business opportunities, the Soul Taco owners recently announced theyre taking the casual taco concept to the burgeoning Raleigh market, with sights on a fall grand opening. The building theyve secured is big enough that theyll block off half of it to eventually introduce North Carolinians to JewFro, too. Keep tabs on JewFros opening date in Shockoe Bottom by following it on Instagram jewfrorestaurant.

Kitchen Kismet
07/26/2021 12:46pm

Korean-born Daniel Harthausen says he wont list all the places hes lived, We moved around a bunch.The itinerant lifestyle, part and parcel with having a parent in the military, an Air Force dad in this case, eventually brought Harthausen to Hampton Roads, where he attended high school before moving to Richmond to make his way in the restaurant industry. At only 21, Harthausen was brought on by Richmond chef John Maher to help run the kitchen at Japanese izakaya concept, Yaki. What started as a pop-up eventually took root in the space that now houses Adarra. I didnt know everything I was doing, Harthausen says. But I was there for the challenge. It ended up not working out, but it was a very influential experience as far as pushing me forward with everything now. After Yaki, the young chef decided to take some time off from cooking, focusing instead on perfecting front-of-house operations, from bartending to managing to serving. Without realizing it, he ended up back at the same building that once housed Yaki. I was a server at Adarra for about a year I wanted to improve my wine knowledge and they were the place to go, Harthausen says. One thing I appreciate about Randall and Lyne Doetzer, Adarras owners is that they never sacrificed what they wanted to give people because of their circumstances, Harthausen says. Theyre rebounding really well because of that. They grinded through this insane time but never gave up what they were about, and I appreciate that.With his passion for cooking reignited, Harthausen decided it was time to get back in the kitchen. He hosted his first Japanese pop-up, Young Mother, at Adarra this March. Hes been hosting a pop-up in the space one Monday a month ever since. I wanted to do a deep dive into Japanese and Korean history because I was never really taught Eastern Asian history in school or anything, and I found there was a lot of overlap between the two countries, Harthausen says, who spent summers as a teen in Okinawa visiting his mother. Turns out, Im part Japanese.Harthausen has been posting long-form, episodic narratives alongside gorgeous food photos on his Young Mother Instagram, exploring the stories behind different Japanese dishes and unfiltered sakes along with his followers.There is a reasoning behind everything I make, Harthausen says. When I approach any concept I have intentionality, otherwise why would you do it I think being transparent about that is fun for the guest, and it also gives me paths to work down.Young Mother events have played out like a typical dinner service no tickets or high expectations required. Its the first time Ive really been in a setting where I can talk to guests after their meal, which is really rewarding, Harthausen says. As for future Young Mother plans Harthausen, who currently runs the coffee program at Common House and also is one of the clubs managers, says hes going to keep dialing in his dishes as long as Adarra will have him. I dont know if necessarily the goal is opening my own space, but I know right now its really fun to do once a month. SKeep an eye out for details on Young Mothers fifth pop-up taking place Aug. 9 at Adarra by following it on Instagram, youngmotherva.

WCVE-TV
WCVE-TV

(804) 320-1301

23 Sesame St
Richmond, VA 23235   Directions

Website

WRIC-TV
WRIC-TV

(804) 330-8888

301 Arboretum Pl
Richmond, VA 23236   Directions

Website

Virginia Gov. Northam reviewing possible mask changes following updated CDC guidance
07/28/2021 11:36am

Virginia Governor Ralph Northam told 8News his team is reviewing mask-wearing guidance after the nations top health agency recommended that even vaccinated people wear masks indoors in parts of the U.S. where the coronavirus is surging.

Richmond Police investigating overnight double shooting in Whitcomb Court
07/28/2021 10:49am

Both men were taken to a local hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. Investigators soon determined that the shooting happened in the 1900 block of Mechanicsville Turnpike.

Soft serve hard cider: Buskey Cider adds new summer treat to the menu
07/28/2021 12:51pm

Right in time for the hot summer months, Buskey Cider has added a soft serve hard cider as an option for customers.

Richmond leaders call for funding to meet state-mandated renovations of combined sewer system
07/28/2021 10:03am

Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney and city leaders came together Wednesday morning to address the need for state and federal funding to remediate the citys combined sewer overflow by 2035.

Virginia Union University to require student vaccines before fall semester
07/28/2021 8:59am

Two weeks prior to arriving on campus, Virginia Union University students will be required to be vaccinated for COVID-19.

WRLH-TV
WRLH-TV

(804) 358-3535

1925 Westmoreland St
Richmond, VA 23230   Directions

Website

WTVR-TV
WTVR-TV

(804) 254-3600

3301 W Broad St
Richmond, VA 23230   Directions

Website

WWBT
WWBT

(804) 230-1212

5710 Midlothian Turnpike
Richmond, VA 23225   Directions

Website

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Independence Golf Club
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